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Tenute Silvio Nardi Brunello di Montalcino 1997

Sangiovese from Montalcino, Tuscany, Italy
  • WS91
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Winemaker Notes

Plenty of concentrated plum aromas, with meat and smoke, turning to violets and other flowers. Full-bodied and very silky, with lots of elegant fruit and a caressing finish. Remains very elegant. Drink now through 2008.

Critical Acclaim

WS 91
Wine Spectator

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Tenute Silvio Nardi

Tenute Silvio Nardi

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Tenute Silvio Nardi, , Italy
Tenute Silvio Nardi
Tenute Silvio Nardi consists of 80 hectares of vineyards in an unspoiled part of central Tuscany: Montalcino, whose symbol is its great red wine, Brunello. Silvio Nardi founded the estate here at Casale del Bosco; since 1985 it has been run by his youngest daughter, Emilia.

Emilia Nardi knows she can depend on Casale's special and distinctive territory to produce a contemporary and elegant Brunello. She has invested single-mindedly in the vineyards in this harmonious natural setting - as any tasting of her fine wines will attest. Each of her signature wines expresses the differing character of Sangiovese when it is grown at Montalcino.

The estate's vineyards are situated between 140 and 420 meters above sea level: some extend north-west of Montalcino on the hills around Casale del Bosco, while others are located to the north of it at Tenuta di Bibbiano and to the south-east at Manachiara, where the precious cru of the same name originates.

By far the largest and best-known winemaking province in Argentina...

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By far the largest and best-known winemaking province in Argentina, Mendoza is responsible for over 70% of the country’s enological output. Set in the eastern foothills of the Andes Mountains, the climate is dry and continental, presenting relatively few challenges for viticulturists during the growing season. Mendoza is divided into several distinctive sub-regions, including Luján de Cuyo and the Uco Valley—two sources of some of the country’s finest wines.

For many wine lovers, Mendoza is practically synonymous with Malbec, originally a Bordelaise variety brought to Argentina by the French in the mid-1800s. Here it found success and renown it never could have achieved in its homeland due to its struggle to ripen fully in finicky climates. Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah, Merlot, and Pinot Noir are all widely planted here as well (and often blended with one another. The best white wines are made from Chardonnay, and there are excellent examples to be found as well from Torrontés, Sauvignon Blanc, and Sémillon.

Chardonnay

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One of the most popular and versatile white wine grapes...

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One of the most popular and versatile white wine grapes, Chardonnay offers a wide range of flavors and styles depending on where it’s grown and how it’s made. In Burgundy, Chardonnay produces some of the finest white wines in the world, typically tending towards minimal intervention in the winery and at its best resulting in remarkable longevity. This grape is popular throughout the world, but perhaps its second most important home is in California, where both oaky, buttery styles and leaner, European-inspired wines enjoy great popularity. Oregon, Australia, South America, South Africa, and New Zealand are also significant producers of Chardonnay.

In the Glass

When planted on cool sites, Chardonnay’s flavors tend towards grapefruit, green apple, minerals, and white stone fruit, while warmer locations coax out richer, more tropical flavors of fig, melon, and pineapple. Oak can add notes of vanilla, coconut, and spice (as well as texture), while malolactic fermentation can impart soft, buttery acidity.

Perfect Pairings

Chardonnay is as versatile at the table as it is in the vineyard. The crisp, clean, Chablis-like styles go well with simple seafood, light chicken dishes, and salads. Richer Chardonnays marry well with cream or oil-based sauces.

Sommelier Secret

Since the 1990s, big, oaky, buttery Chardonnays from California have enjoyed explosive popularity. More recently, the pendulum has begun to swing in the opposite direction, towards a clean, crisp style that rarely utilizes new oak. These Old-World style wines have been dubbed the “New California Chardonnays,” and anyone who claims they do not like Chardonnay should give them a try.

CLW105407_1997 Item# 55115

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