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Tendril Pinot Noir 2009

Pinot Noir from Willamette Valley, Oregon
  • WE94
14.3% ABV
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14.3% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Blended from nine impeccably farmed vineyards in five AVAs: Eola-Amity Hills, Yamhill-Carlton, McMinnville, Ribbon Ridge and Chehalem Mountains, this precocious wine offers up a nose with a wide array of aromatics including wild plum, raspberry, currant, allspice, menthol, vanilla and a touch of anise. The palate is lush and vibrant, highlighted by flavors of fresh bing cherry, loganberry, white pepper, raspberry cordial, and a hint of rose petal with fine tannins and good length.

Critical Acclaim

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WE 94
Wine Enthusiast
Deep, firm and concentrated, this gorgeous wine has the muscularity of Cabernet, but the plush, velvet elegance of Pinot Noir. Youthful and rich, it has deep fruit flavors of blackberry and black cherry, with barrel notes of coffee, chocolate and anise. Full, smooth and supple, it is certainly among the best of the Oregon 2009s. Cellar Selection.
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Tendril

Tendril

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Tendril, , Oregon
Tendril
Tony Rynders squeezes a full bladder press of cellar cred into his wholly owned new brand, Tendril Wine Cellars. Tony's professional wine experience began in 1989 in the lab at Mirassou. He then went on to graduate from UC Davis in 1993 with a Masters Degree in Viticulture and Enology. Next, off on a world tour of practical experience in Carneros, Friuli, Tuscany and South Australia. Then, assistant winemaker at Argyle in Oregon and red winemaker at Hogue in Washington. All of this finally prepares him for ten years as head winemaker at Domaine Serene where he collected more 90+ scores from Wine Spectator than any other winemaker over the same ten years. In the same period The Wine Advocate named Domaine Serene one of Oregon's two "Outstanding" producers while Wine & Spirits awarded Winery of the Year for five consecutive years. Amazingly, during this time Tony oversaw the growing of Domaine Serene from a 2500 to a 25,000 case super-premium winery.

At Tendril, Tony has taken a deep breath and scaled way back. While quality is at the uncompromising high level one would expect, quantity is limited to around 500 cases per year and to Pinot Noir only. Similar to Mike Januik's story in Washington State, there's hardly a great grower in Oregon who would not be happy to provide Tony with whatever fruit he desires, and the best possible fruit attainable he does indeed get. Though he managed a large cellar staff at Domaine Serene, Tony and assistant winemaker Samantha Poehlman, also a Domaine Serene alum, perform every task at Tendril themselves. The results have been breathtakingly beautiful.

Walla Walla Valley

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Responsible for some of Washington’s most highly acclaimed wines, the Walla Walla Valley has experienced a surge in popularity in recent years. It is home to both historic wineries and younger, up-and-coming producers. Though it is cooler and wetter than most of Washington State’s viticultural areas, irrigation from the Columbia River is still common, though some vineyards on the rainier eastern end of the AVA are able to dry farm.

The conditions in the Walla Walla Valley are perfectly suited to Rhône-inspired Syrahs, distinguished by savory notes of black olives, smoke, bacon fat, and fresh earth. Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot are produced in a range of styles from smooth and supple to tannic and structured. White varieties are a relative rarity here. Sauvignon Blanc is sometimes blended with Sémillon in the style of Bordeaux white blends, resulting in a richer, rounder version take on the variety. Plantings of Viognier are minimal, but often quite successful.

Cabernet Sauvignon

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A noble variety bestowed with both power and concentration, Cabernet Sauvignon is sometimes referred to as the “king” of red grapes. It can be somewhat unapproachable early in its youth but has the potential to age beautifully, with the ability to last fifty years or more at its best. Small berries and tough skins provide its trademark firm tannic grip, while high acidity helps to keep the wine fresh for decades. Cabernet Sauvignon flourishes in temperate climates like Bordeaux's Medoc region (and in St-Emillion and Pomerol, where it plays a supporting role to Merlot). The top Médoc producers use Cabernet Sauvignon for their wine’s backbone, blending it with Merlot and smaller amounts of Cabernet Franc, Malbec, and/or Petit Verdot. On its own, Cabernet Sauvignon has enjoyed great success throughout the world, particularly in the Napa Valley, and is responsible for some of the world’s most prestigious and sought-after “cult” wines.

In the Glass

High in color, tannin, and extract, Cabernet Sauvignon expresses notes of blackberry, cassis, plum, currant, spice, and tobacco. In Bordeaux and elsewhere in the Old World you'll find the more earthy, tannic side of Cabernet, where it's typically blended to soften tannins and add complexity. In warmer regions like California and Australia, you can typically expect more ripe fruit flavors upfront.

Perfect Pairings

Cabernet Sauvignon is right at home with rich, intense meat dishes—beef, lamb, and venison, in particular—where its opulent fruit and decisive tannins make an equal match to the dense protein of the meat. With a mature Cabernet, opt for tender, slow-cooked meat dishes.

Sommelier Secrets

Despite the modern importance and ubiquity of Cabernet Sauvignon, it is actually a relatively young variety. In 1997, DNA revealed the grape to be a spontaneous crossing of Cabernet Franc and Sauvignon Blanc which took place in 17th century southwestern France.

NWWTD09PN_2009 Item# 118744

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