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St. Urbans-Hof Ockfener Bockstein Kabinett 2009

Riesling from Mosel, Germany
  • WS92
  • RP91
8% ABV
  • WS92
  • RP90
  • WE90
  • RP93
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8% ABV

Winemaker Notes

#57 Wine Spectator Top 100 of 2010

"Ockfener Bockstein" which is a steep valley slope with unobstructed southern exposure. The soil consists of hard slate stones, which, in fact, leave a grayish blue powder residue when handled. This is indicative of the solubility of the soil, which allows the vine roots to ab-sorb mineral nutrients quickly and easily during the growing season. As a result the wines of Ockfener Bockstein are especially lively and minerally in charac-ter. A forest at the top of the slope retains water which is released into the sub-soils of the vineyards during dry periods, mitigating vine-stress during periods of drought.

This 2009 wine has elegance, expression and power. The minerality is almost sparkling. The acidity is ripe but still crisp. The flavours are complex, ripe and well developed. This wine promises to be the most age-worthy of the decade.

Critical Acclaim

All Vintages
WS 92
Wine Spectator
This boasts enticing peach, apricot, lime, and slate aromas and flavors, with a touch of vanilla cream. This is creamy, yet bright and pure, displaying persistence and a complex finish. Drink now through 2025
RP 91
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The whiff of yeastiness in the nose of Weis's 2009 Ockfener Bockstein Riesling Kabinett (from the original Neuwied vineyard) proves perfectly delightful as an accent to apple and orange blossom; pineapple and cherry, all of which persist on an ultra-refreshing, generously juicy, delicate palate whose saline and seemingly crystalline mineral notes make for uncontrollable salivation. Look for 15 or more years of delight from this quintessential Kabinett and outstanding value, whose sweetness seems impeccably balanced despite its fully 50 grams of residual sugar. Despite Weis's laudatory comments about Bockstein this vintage, he still sells its wines at the customary lower price than those of Goldtropfchen.
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St. Urbans-Hof

St. Urbans-Hof

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St. Urbans-Hof, , Germany
St. Urbans-Hof
For our family, wine has been at the heart of life for generations. Our deep respect for the traditions of our region remains, as ever, the guarantee for the quality of our wines.

In our endeavours we give highest priority to maintaining the egological balance of our vineyards, in the belief that as winemakers we must recognize and respect the fragile unity of viticulture and nature.

St. Urbans-Hof employs traditional methods of wine growing and winemaking which have been used in the Mosel and Saar Valleys for centuries, some of which date back to the Romans. For example, the vines are grown on the traditional single-post 'Heart-binding' trellis system, whereby the canes are tied in the shape of a heart.

Also, organic fertilizers are utilized in order to maintain the natural balance of the soil. Most importantly, yields are kept at low levels in order to achieve intense and well-structured wines. For optimal flavour development, leaves are thinned and grapes are harvested as late as possible to allow for maximum ripening. All grapes are hand picked and carried from the vineyard in traditional shoulder-mounted containers called 'hotten' to ensure optimal fruit quality.

Just as important as the great length taken to deliver the best possible fruit from the vineyard is the careful attention given to the proper traetment of the grapes by cellarmaster Rudolf Hoffmann. The grapes are lightly crushed, after which they remain on the skins for a short period to ensure the complete release of aromas into the juice.

After this, the pulp of skins and juice is gently pressed and fermented in stainless steel tanks at cool cellar temperatures to fully capture the aromas, flavours and delicate natural spritz of the Riesling grape. The wines are then transferred into traditional 1000 litre 'Fuder' barrels for several months to harmonize, after which they are lightly filtered and bottled.

Beaujolais

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The bucolic region often identified as the southern part of Burgundy, Beaujolais actually doesn’t have a whole lot in common with the rest of the region in terms of climate, soil types and grape varieties. Beaujolais achieves its own identity with variations on style of one grape, Gamay.

Gamay was actually grown throughout all of Burgundy until 1395 when the Duke of Burgundy banished it south, making room for Pinot noir to inhabit all of the “superior” hillsides of Burgundy proper. This was good news for Gamay as it produces a much better wine in the granitic soils of Beaujolais, compared with the limestone escarpments of the Côte d’Or.

Four styles of Beaujolais exist though most is sold under the basic Beaujolais appellation. The simplest, and one that has regrettably given the region a subpar reputation, is Beaujolais Nouveau. This is the wine that is made using carbonic maceration (a quick fermentation that results in sweet aromas) and is released on the third Thursday of November in the same year as harvest. It's meant to drink young and is flirty, fruity and fun. The rest of Beaujolais is where the serious wines are found. Beaujolais-Villages, which must come from the hilly northern part of the region, offer reasonable values with some gems among them. The superior section are the cru vineyards coming from ten distinct communes: St-Amour, Juliénas, Chénas, Moulin-à-Vent, Fleurie, Chiroubles, Morgon, Regnié, Brouilly, and Côte de Brouilly. Any cru Beajolais will have its commune name prominent on the label.

Delightfully playful yet at its best capable of impressive gravitas, Gamay is responsible for juicy, berry-flavored wines in Beaujolais and parts of the Loire Valley. It has received some criticism for its role in Beaujolais Nouveau, a young beverage more reminiscent of fruit punch than wine. But make no mistake—the Gamay grape is very capable of producing light yet serious wines, especially in the cru villages of Beaujolais. The variety is also widely planted in Savoie and Switzerland, and has recently found success on a small but growing scale in Oregon.

In the Glass

Gamay can be decidedly light and fruity with flavors cherry candy and cranberry. Made for Beaujolais Nouveau, with a quick fermentation process, the wines give fun and flirty aromas of banana or bubblegum. The Nouveau style is to drink early and not contemplate. More complex Gamays (Village or cru level) offer dark blackberry or ripe cherry flavors with enticing aromas of baking spice, violets and dark wet earth as well as aging potential.

Perfect Pairings

Gamay is delicious on its own, especially with a light chill. It is the quintessential picnic red and goes well with simple charcuterie, country pate, and terrines. Served at a cool temperature, it is an unexpected but outstanding partner for freshly shucked oysters. Gentle tannins and bright acidity make it a great option with Asian food, even dishes with a bit of a spicy kick. Gamay can also be a great pairing with poultry, especially duck or Thanksgiving turkey with cranberry sauce.

Sommelier Secret

Within Beaujolais, there are ten different crus, or highly ranked grape-growing communes. Each one has its own distinct personality—Fleurie is delicate and floral, Côte de Brouilly is concentrated and elegant, and Morgon is serious, structured, and age-worthy, capable of rivaling some red Burgundies.

PIN298973_2009 Item# 106837

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