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Seven Daughters Moscato 2016

Muscat from Italy
    7.5% ABV
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    Currently Unavailable $12.99
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    4.4 49 Ratings
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    4.4 49 Ratings
    7.5% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    Seven Daughters Moscato is a delicious wine made from 100% Muscat grapes sourced from northern Italy. This effervescent, bright white wine has a sweet floral aroma with peach and honey notes. Well-balanced with a refined fruitiness, the natural fragrance and flavor of the Moscato grape shine for a delightful, refreshing sip.

    Drink chilled by itself or serve with foods like fresh fruit or sweet treats.

    Critical Acclaim

    All Vintages
    Seven Daughters

    Seven Daughters

    View all wine
    Seven Daughters, Italy
    At Seven Daughters, they view the artistry of blending varietals as a reflection of what a you do every day of the week. You work hard, play hard and still find time to meet up with your friends and raise a glass. Like your lifestyle, your wine should be full of character, complexity and quality.

    Seven Daughters wines are crafted to meet the needs of today's wine drinker – a seamless blend of exploration, fun and sophistication. We toast you for doing all that you do, for blending the best with the best everyday. Seven Daughters Winemaker's Blends – like you and your friends, all different, and yet so perfect together.

    Named “Oenotria” by the ancient Greeks for its abundance of grapevines, Italy has always had a culture virtually inextricable from wine. Wine grapes grow in every region throughout the country—a long and narrow boot-shaped peninsula extending into the Mediterranean. Naturally, most Italian regions enjoy a Mediterranean climate and a notable coastline, if not coastline on all borders, as is the case with the islands of Sicily and Sardinia.

    The Alps in the northern regions of Valle d'Aosta, Lombardy and Alto Adige as examples, create favorable conditions for cool-climate varieties, while the Apennine Mountains, extending from Liguria in the north to Calabria in the south, affect climate, grape variety and harvest periods throughout. Considering its variable terrain and conditions, it's still safe to say that most high quality viticulture in Italy takes place on picturesque hillsides.

    Italy boasts more indigenous varieties than any other country—between 500 and 800, depending on whom you ask—and most wine production relies upon these native grapes. In some regions, international varieties have worked their way in, but are declining in popularity, especially as younger growers take interest in reviving local varieties. Most important are Sangiovese, reaching its greatest potential in Tuscany and Nebbiolo, the prized grape of Piedmont, producing single varietal, age-worthy wines. Other important varieties include Corvina, Montepulciano, Barbera, Nero d’Avola and of course the whites, Pinot Grigio and Trebbiano. The list goes on.

    Alluringly aromatic and delightful, Muscat never takes itself too seriously. Muscat is actually an umbrella name for a diverse set of grapes, some of which are genetically related and some of which, are not. The two most important versions are the noble, Muscat blanc à Petits Grains, making wines of considerable quality and Muscat of Alexandria, thought to be a progeny of the former. Both are grown throughout the world and can be made in a wide range of styles from dry to sweet, still to sparkling and even fortified. It is well known in Italy's Piedmont region for Moscato d’Asti, a slightly sparkling, semi-sweet, refreshing wine that is low in alcohol. On the Iberian peninsula, it goes by Moscatel, not to be confused with Bordeaux's Muscadelle, which is acutally unrelated.

    In the Glass

    Muscat wines possess marked aromatics and flavors of peach, pear, Meyer lemon, orange, orange blossom, rose petal, jasmine, honeysuckle or lychee, often with a hint of sweet spice.

    Perfect Pairings

    Thanks to its naturally low alcohol levels, Muscat is a perfect match for spicy Asian cuisine, especially when the wine has a little bit of residual sugar. Off-dry Muscat can work well with lighter desserts like key lime pie and lemon meringue, while fully sweet Muscat-based dessert wines are enjoyable after dinner with an assortment of cheeses.

    Sommelier Secret

    Muscat is one of the oldest known grape varieties, dating as far back as the days of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Pliny the Elder wrote in the 13th century of a sweet, perfumed grape variety so attractive to bees that he referred to it as uva apiana, or “grape of the bees.” Most likely, he was describing one of the Muscat varieties.

    ULL657123_2016 Item# 277616