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Sauvion Sevre Et Maine Muscadet 2010

Melon de Bourgogne from Pays Nantais, Loire, France
  • WS87
12.5% ABV
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12.5% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Pale gold color with floral, exotic fruit and slightly toasted notes. Fresh, round and well-balanced on the palate, with good fullness; pleasant finish evoking exotic fruits and hazelnut.

Excellent with sushi, spicy Asian food and tapas.

Critical Acclaim

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WS 87
Wine Spectator
Tangy, with extra cut from the lively lime and sea salt notes, ending with a bright finish. Drink now. 2,000 cases imported.
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Sauvion

Sauvion

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Sauvion, , France - Other regions
Sauvion
One of the best-known Muscadet producers, Sauvion has long been established in the Loire Valley. Jean-Ernest (often referred to as the "Wizard of the Loire") and Yves Sauvion have carefully put together a range of delicious and diversified wines that have set the tone for much of the Loire Valley.

Château du Cléray-Sauvion, located in the heart of the Nantes region, is one of the oldest estates of the Muscadet Sèvre et Maine region and serves as the home to the Sauvion family. It is also one of the few Muscadet-producing Châteaux.

Barossa Valley

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Historically and presently the most important wine-producing region of Australia, the Barossa Valley is set in South Australia, where more than half of the country’s wine is made. Because the climate is very hot and dry, vineyard managers must be careful so that grapes do not become overripe. Some of the oldest vines in Australia can be found here—in the cooler, wetter Eden Valley sub-region, the Hill of Grace vineyard is home to 140+ year old Shiraz vines.

The intense heat is ideal for plush, bold reds, particularly Rhône blends featuring Shiraz, Grenache, and Mataro (Mourvèdre). White grapes can produce crisp, fresh wines from Riesling, Chardonnay, and Semillon if they are planted at higher altitudes where they may benefit from cool breezes, particularly in the Eden Valley.

Riesling

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A regal variety of incredible purity and precision, Riesling possesses a remarkable ability to reflect the character of wherever it is grown while still maintaining easily identifiable typicity. This versatile grape can be just as enjoyable dry or sweet, young or old, still or sparkling, and can age longer than nearly any other white variety. Riesling is best known in Germany and Alsace, and is also of great importance in Austria. The variety has also been particularly successful in Australia’s Clare and Eden Valleys, New Zealand, Oregon, Washington, cooler regions of California, and the Finger Lakes in New York.

In the Glass

Riesling is low in alcohol, with high acidity, steely minerality, and stone fruit, spice, citrus, and floral notes. At its ripest it leans towards juicy peach and nectarine, and pineapple, while in cooler climes it is more redolent of meyer lemon, lime, and green apple. With age, Riesling can become truly revelatory, developing unique, complex aromatics, often with a hint of gasoline.

Perfect Pairings

Riesling is very versatile, enjoying the company of sweet-fleshed fish like sole, most Asian food, especially Thai and Vietnamese (bottlings with some residual sugar and low alcohol are the perfect companions for dishes with substantial spice), and freshly shucked oysters. Sweeter styles work well with fruit-based desserts.

Sommelier Secret

It can be difficult to discern the level of sweetness in a Riesling, and German labeling laws do not make things any easier. Look for the world “trocken” to indicate a dry wine, or “halbtrocken” or “feinherb” for off-dry. Some producers will include a helpful sweetness scale on the back label—happily, a growing trend.

GZT3809315_2010 Item# 112299

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