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Recanati Upper Galilee Chardonnay 2013

Chardonnay from Israel
    13% ABV
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    13% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    Pale straw gold in the glass with delicate aromas of tropical fruit with subtle nuances of caramel and hazelnut. Full-bodied and harmonious, concluding in a long, smooth finish.

    Critical Acclaim

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    Recanati

    Recanati

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    Recanati, Israel
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    The story of the Recanati Winery, a new producer of high quality Mediterranean wines, begins with a profound bond with the Land of Israel coupled with a passion for fine wines. With the creation of the winery, L. Recanati's cherished, lifelong dream to produce truly world-class wines has finally reached fruition.

    Owner of one of the finest private wine collections in Israel, L. Recanati is a successful international banker and a member of one of Israel's most prominent families. Prior to making their home in Israel in the early 1900s, Recanati's ancestors had lived for centuries in Italy, one of the world's premier sources of fine wines. Consequently, Italy and the U.S. (where Recanati spent a portion of his student years and met his American-born wife) represent the winery's first two export markets.

    Chief winemaker at Recanati is Lewis Pasco, an American-born graduate of the U.C. Davis wine program and an accomplished chef. Formerly a winemaker at Napa Valley's Chimney Rock and for Sonoma's Marimar Torres, Lewis brings to Recanati a devotion to artistry and craftsmanship in winemaking. This dedication, combined with Recanati's state-of-the-art winemaking facility, has led to an impressive line of wines.

    With a rich history of wine production dating back to biblical times, Israel is a part of the cradle of wine civilization. Here, wine was commonly used for religious ceremonies as well as for general consumption. During Roman times, it was a popular export, but during Islamic rule around 1300, production was virtually extinguished. The modern era of Israeli winemaking began in the late 19th century with help from Bordeaux’s Rothschild family. Accordingly, most grapes grown in Israel today are made from native French varieties. Indigenous varieties are all but extinct, though oenologists have made recent attempts to rediscover ancient varieties such as Marawi for commercial wine production.

    In Israel’s Mediterranean climate, humidity and drought can be problematic, concentrating much of the country’s grape growing in the north near Galilee, Samaria near the coast and at higher elevations in the east. The most successful red varieties are Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Syrah, while the best whites are made from Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc. Many, though by no means all, Israeli wines are certified Kosher.

    Chardonnay

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    One of the most popular and versatile white wine grapes, Chardonnay offers a wide range of flavors and styles depending on where it is grown and how it is made. While practically every country in the wine producing world grows it, Chardonnay from its Burgundian homeland produces some of the most remarkable and longest lived examples. As far as cellar potential, white Burgundy rivals the world’s other age-worthy whites like Riesling or botrytized Semillon. California is Chardonnay’s second most important home, where both oaky, buttery styles and leaner, European-inspired wines enjoy great popularity. Oregon, Australia and South America are also significant producers of Chardonnay.

    In the Glass

    When planted on cool sites, Chardonnay flavors tend towards grapefruit, lemon zest, green apple, celery leaf and wet flint, while warmer locations coax out richer, more tropical flavors of melon, peach and pineapple. Oak can add notes of vanilla, coconut and spice, while malolactic fermentation imparts a soft and creamy texture.

    Perfect Pairings

    Chardonnay is as versatile at the table as it is in the vineyard. The crisp, clean, Chablis-like styles go well with flaky white fish with herbs, scallops, turkey breast and soft cheeses. Richer Chardonnays marry well with lobster, crab, salmon, roasted chicken and creamy sauces.

    Sommelier Secret

    Since the 1990s, big, oaky, buttery Chardonnays from California have enjoyed explosive popularity. More recently, the pendulum has begun to swing in the opposite direction, towards a clean, crisp style that rarely utilizes new oak. In Burgundy, the subregion of Chablis, while typically employing the use of older oak barrels, produces a similar bright and acid-driven style. Anyone who doesn't like oaky Chardonnay would likely enjoy its lighter style.

    SWS378357_2013 Item# 141094