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Pannonhalmi Apatsagi Pinceszet Tricollis White 2016

Other White Blends from Hungary
    12.94% ABV
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    12.94% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    Due to its strict technological processing, this wine delivers the fresh and crispy flavors of early summer fruits with its floral and pleasant aromas during its first months after bottling while exhibits the deeper character of the Riesling varieties for the following months and years.

    Recommended to be consumed with roasted or cooked white meats and vegetable garnishes or as a perfect companion of friendly discussions.

    Blend: 40% Welshriesling, 35% Rheinriesling, 15% Gewurztraminer, 10% Pinot Blanc

    Critical Acclaim

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    Pannonhalmi Apatsagi Pinceszet

    Pannonhalmi Apatsagi Pinceszet

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    Pannonhalmi Apatsagi Pinceszet, Hungary
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    Pannonhalmi Apatsagi Pinceszet directly translates in Hungarian to "Abbey Winery Pannonhalma". Winemaking started in the Pannonhalma region when Benedictine monks founded the monastery of Pannonhalma in 996. The monks have always been closely associated with viticulture and winemaking since it was introduced by the Romans. Social and political turmoil following World War II made it impossible to continue the centuries-old traditions, since both the properties and the winery were taken over by the Communist state.

    In the ensuing decades, monks living in Pannonhalma did not give up hope of resuscitating their wine-making traditions. Since the fall of Communism, the monks have revived the viticultural traditions and the wineries. In 2000, the abbey repurchased vineyards that had been confiscated and began replanting grape vines in the same year.

    The main grape varieties are Rhine Riesling, Pinot Noir, Sauvignon Blanc, Gewürztraminer, and Welshriesling. In addition, they have planted the more international Chardonnay, Pinot Blanc, Merlot, and Cabernet Franc. They currently have 52 hectares under vine and the first harvest took place in autumn 2003.

    Under the guidance of the well-respected and international winemaker Tibor Gal (he made Ornellaia for many years), all vineyards were replanted and a modern, three tier gravity flow cellar was built. Pannonhalma lies equidistant between Budapest and Vienna and is one of the smallest of Hungary’s 22 wine regions. Topographical conditions resemble those of the upper Loire Valley, Alsace, or Burgundy. Sustainable farming practices are used and the harvest is by hand. The wines produced at Pannonhalmi Apatsagi Pinceszet bear marks of its terroir and reflect its history and authenticity.

    Best known for lusciously sweet dessert wines but also home to distinctive dry whites and reds, Hungary is an exciting country at the crossroads of tradition and innovation. Mostly flat with a continental climate, Hungary is almost perfectly bisected by the Danube River (known here as the Duna), and contains central Europe’s largest lake, Balaton. Soil types vary throughout the country but some of the best vines, particularly in Tokaj, are planted on mineral-rich, volcanic soil.

    Tokaj, Hungary’s most famous wine region, is home to the venerated botrytized sweet wine, Tokaji, produced from a blend of Furmint and Hárslevelű. Dry and semi-dry wines are also made in Tokaj, using the same varieties. Other native white varieties include the relatively aromatic and floral, Irsai Olivér, Cserszegi Fűszeres and Királyleányka, as well as the distinctively smoky and savory, Juhfark. Common red varieties include velvety, Pinot Noir-like Kadarka and juicy, easy-drinking Kékfrankos (known elsewhere as Blaufränkisch).

    Other White Blends

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    With hundreds of white grape varieties to choose from, winemakers have the freedom to create a virtually endless assortment of blended wines. In many European regions, strict laws are in place determining the set of varieties that may be used, but in the New World, experimentation is permitted and encouraged. Blending can be utilized to enhance balance or create complexity, lending different layers of flavors and aromas. For example, a variety that creates a soft and full-bodied wine would do well combined with one that is more fragrant and naturally high in acidity. Sometimes small amounts of a particular variety are added to boost color or aromatics. Blending can take place before or after fermentation, with the latter, more popular option giving more control to the winemaker over the final qualities of the wine.

    SKRTPA031_2016 Item# 293867