Krug Brut Rose (1.5L Magnum) Front Label
Krug Brut Rose (1.5L Magnum) Front Label

Krug Brut Rose (1.5L Magnum)

  • WW98
  • W&S96
  • TP96
  • JS96
  • WS95
  • WE94
  • RP92
  • CG92
1500ML / 0% ABV
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1500ML / 0% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Unexpected subtleness of its pale pink color, promise of elegance and refinement. Aromas of rose hips, cured ham, mulberries, redcurrant, peony, pepper and pink grapefruit. Delicate flavours of honey, citrus and dried fruit with long ending, enhanced by its subtle bubbles.

Krug Rose can be enjoyed alone or with foie gras, lamb, game, white meat, venison or anchovies, as well as very savory and spicy dishes.

Critical Acclaim

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WW 98
Wilfred Wong of Wine.com
One of the most elegant wine in all the world, the stylish and persistent Krug Champagne Rosé always has a special place in my heart. In a lifetime of popping corks, I have always found myself thrilled at the opportunity to savor this wine. At the Wine & Spirits Top 100 Tasting, I made certain not to miss it. Introduced in 1983 and made in small quantities each year, it not only met all expectations but even exceed them. Showing a bare salmon in color, pinpoint bubbles, a steady mousse, and classic wild strawberry flavors, it was my favorite of all the wines of the event. (Tasted: October 10, 2016, San Francisco, CA)
W&S 96
Wine & Spirits
Eric Lebel achieves the beautiful color of this wine with the addition of pinot noir fermented on its skins. The rest of the blend includes reserve wines and selections of chardonnay, pinot noir and meunier that come together in Krug’s most ephemeral Champagne, an effervescent mist of flavor with the depths of a grand cru Vosne-Romanée. Resonant bass notes hold earthy complexity while vibrant freshness rises with the bubbles. An elegant rosé to pour with thin slices of roast duck breast.
TP 96
Tasting Panel
Deep salmon pink; smooth, elegant nose; lush and mouthfilling but refined and elegant; seamless, complex, layered and masterful.
JS 96
James Suckling
Super fresh and bright with musky red fruit aromas as well as gently marzipan scented biscuits on the nose; spices all here too. Great complexity and depth, really elegant, assertive and deep. Long and even, superb depth through the finish. Great wine. Drink young and precocious. Krug ID 313042
WS 95
Wine Spectator
Fine and harmonious, this expressive rosé offers grilled nut and coffee accents, layered with exotic spice, dried peach, raspberry, biscuit, pastry cream and bergamot notes. Long and focused, with the flavor range carried on the silky, detailed mousse and driven by vibrant acidity. Disgorged summer 2013. Drink now through 2025.
WE 94
Wine Enthusiast
The beauty of Krug’s rosé is the sense of bottle age, of that extra richness. That means the wine is not just the sum of its delicious red berry fruits. It’s also the way the wine is rounded out, filled with secondary flavors, toast and almonds and a taut minerality. The aftertaste is taut, dry, seamless, complex.
RP 92
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
Krug’s NV Brut Rose ID 212020 – disgorged in spring, 2012, and as always for this cuvee, featuring slightly fewer and younger components than the Grande Cuvee, and an addition of still red Pinot – makes a bright, juicy impression of red raspberry and red currant mingled with fresh lime and tingling with mouthwatering mineral salts. Firmer in feel than the Grande Cuvee and without that bottling’s remarkable juxtaposition of creaminess with brightness, nor indeed its complexity, this finishes with the invigoration of red berry seed-crunching; a piquant hint of orange rind; and fascination of alkaline, saline and chalky nuances. It might well prove interesting to follow for a few years, though I haven’t the experience to address this cuvee’s track record.
CG 92
Connoisseurs' Guide
High in autolyzed yeast and showing the layered complexity of lengthy aging, this non-vintaged bottling is a classic expression of the Krug style. It is, in all truth, not as concerned with fruit as many, but its very firm balance, fine foamy mousse and its long, brisk flavors will not disappoint aficionados.
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Krug

Krug

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Krug, France
Krug Winery Video
Since 1843, six generations of the Krug Family have been creating the finest and rarest Champagnes. Behind every precious drop of Krug stands the dream of a visionary. One man who, long before others, understood that the essence of Champagne is pleasure. So, over 170 years ago, Joseph Krug broke with convention to follow his vision: to create the most generous expression of Champagne every year, regardless of climatic unpredictability. Thanks to an uncompromising craftsmanship, a unique individual plot by plot approach from harvesting to blending, an unparalleled library of 150 reserve wines, and an exceptional cellar aging, Krug is the benchmark when it comes to the best champagnes in the world.

Krug Grande Cuvée is the flagship of the House and the archetype of Krug’s philosophy of craftsmanship and savoir-faire: a blend of more than 120 wines from ten or more different years. Its exceptional finesse is the result of a stay of at least another six years in the cellars. Over twenty years are needed to craft each bottle of Krug Grande Cuvee.

Every year since the foundation of the House in 1843, one creation, one blend, one bottling and thus one new Edition of Krug Grande Cuvée has come to life. The number of the Edition is now featured on the front label, and this year we celebrate the 164th Edition.

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Associated with luxury, celebration, and romance, the region, Champagne, is home to the world’s most prized sparkling wine. In order to bear the label, ‘Champagne’, a sparkling wine must originate from this northeastern region of France—called Champagne—and adhere to strict quality standards. Made up of the three towns Reims, Épernay, and Aÿ, it was here that the traditional method of sparkling wine production was both invented and perfected, birthing a winemaking technique as well as a flavor profile that is now emulated worldwide.

Well-drained, limestone and chalky soil defines much of the region, which lend a mineral component to its wines. Champagne’s cold, continental climate promotes ample acidity in its grapes but weather differences from year to year can create significant variation between vintages. While vintage Champagnes are produced in exceptional years, non-vintage cuvées are produced annually from a blend of several years in order to produce Champagnes that maintain a consistent house style.

With nearly negligible exceptions, three varieties are permitted for use in Champagne: Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, and Pinot Meunier. These can be blended together or bottled as individual varietal Champagnes, depending on the final style of wine desired. Chardonnay, the only white variety, contributes freshness, elegance, lively acidity and notes of citrus, orchard fruit and white flowers. Pinot Noir and its relative Pinot Meunier, provide the backbone to many blends, adding structure, body and supple red fruit flavors. Wines with a large proportion of Pinot Meunier will be ready to drink earlier, while Pinot Noir contributes to longevity. Whether it is white or rosé, most Champagne is made from a blend of red and white grapes—and uniquely, rosé is often produce by blending together red and white wine. A Champagne made exclusively from Chardonnay will be labeled as ‘blanc de blancs,’ while ones comprised of only red grapes are called ‘blanc de noirs.’

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What are the different types of Champagne and sparkling wine?

Beloved for its lively bubbles, sparkling wine is the ultimate beverage for any festivity, whether it's a major celebration or a mere merrymaking of nothing much! Sparkling wine is made throughout the winemaking world, but only can be called “Champagne” if it comes from the Champagne region of France and is made using what is referred to as the "traditional method." Other regions have their own specialties—Crémant in other parts of France, Cava in Spain and Prosecco in Italy, to name a few. New World regions like California, Australia and New Zealand enjoy the freedom to make many styles, with production methods and traditions defined locally. In a dry style, Champagne and sparkling wine goes with just about any type of food. Sweet styles are not uncommon and among both dry and sweet, you'll find white, rosé—or even red!—examples.

How is Champagne and sparkling wine made?

Champagne, Crémant, Cava and many other sparkling wines of the world are made using the traditional method, in which the second fermentation (the one that makes the bubbles) takes place inside the bottle. With this method, spent yeast cells remain in contact with the wine during bottle aging, giving it a creamy mouthful, toasted bread or brioche qualities and in many cases, the capacity to age. For Prosecco, the carbonation process usually occurs in a stainless steel tank (before bottling) to preserve the fresh fruity and floral aromas imminent in this style.

What gives Champagne and sparkling wine its bubbles?

The bubbles in sparkling wine are formed when the base wine undergoes a secondary fermentation, which traps carbon dioxide inside the bottle or fermentation vessel.

How do you serve Champagne and sparkling wine?

Ideally for storing Champagne and sparkling wine in any long-term sense, it should be at cellar temperature, about 55F. For serving, cool Champagne and sparkling wine down to about 40F to 50F. (Most refrigerators are colder than this.) As for drinking Champagne and sparkling wine, the best glasses have a stem and flute or tulip shape to allow the bead (bubbles) to show.

How long does Champagne and sparkling wine last?

Most sparkling wines like Prosecco, Cava or others around the “$20 and under” price point are intended for early consumption. Wines made using the traditional method with extended cellar time before release can typically improve with age. If you are unsure, definitely consult a wine professional for guidance.

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