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Guigal Chateauneuf-du-Pape 2009

Rhone Red Blends from Chateauneuf-du-Pape, Rhone, France
  • RP92
  • W&S91
  • WS90
0% ABV
  • RP93
  • JS91
  • RP92
  • W&S93
  • RP93
  • WS92
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0% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Deep dark red with aromas of spices and mature red fruits. On the palate, round tannins with powerful complexity. A rich unctuous wine with notes of mature plums, hazelnuts and red fruits. Very rich wine full of harmony and balance.

Critical Acclaim

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RP 92
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The 2009 Chateauneuf du Pape appears to be a beautiful wine, although perhaps not at the level of the 2007 or 2010 (which will not be released for another two years). The elegant, medium to full-bodied 2009 displays lots of cedary, berry fruit intermixed with notes of garrigue, Christmas fruitcake, kirsch and spice. It is best consumed in its first decade of life.
W&S 91
Wine & Spirits
Salty, smoky and peaty, this is a compelling earthy Chateauneuf-du-Pape, savory and dark. It's not a big wine but it has staying power, the flavors fragrant, the supple tannins giving the wine a velvety density. Drink it over the next five years, with game birds or other lean, gamey meat.
WS 90
Wine Spectator
An old-school version, showing brick dust, roasted chestnut, game and singed cedar notes around a core of dried cherry and red currant fruit. The burly finish lets pepper and game accents play out. Lacks the fleshy, opulent profile of the vintage but maintains an appealing character. Drink now through 2020.
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Guigal

Guigal

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Guigal, , France - Rhone
Guigal
The Guigal domain was founded in 1946 by Etienne Guigal in the ancient village of Ampuis, home of the wines of the Côte-Rôtie. In these vineyards that are over 2400 years old, you can still see the small terraced walls characteristic of the Roman period. Etienne Guigal arrived in this region in 1923 at the age of 14. He made wine for over 67 vintages and, at the beginning of his career, participated in the development of the Vidal-Fleury establishment.

Despite his young age, Marcel Guigal took over from his father in 1961 when the latter was victim to a brutal illness rendering him blind. Marcel's hard work and perseverance enabled the Guigals to buy out Vidal-Fleury in 1984, although the establishment retains its own identity and commercial autonomy. In 2000, the Guigals purchased the Jean-Louis Grippat estate in Saint-Joseph and Hermitage, as well as the Domaine de Vallouit in Côte-Rôtie, Hermitage, Saint-Joseph and Crozes-Hermitage.

In the cellars of the Guigal estate in Ampuis, the northern appellations of the Rhône Valley are produced and aged. These are the appellations of Côte-Rôtie, Condrieu, Hermitage, Saint-Joseph and Crozes-Hermitage. The great appellations of the Southern Rhône, Châteauneuf-du-Pape, Gigondas, Tavel and Côtes-du-Rhône, are also aged in the Ampuis cellars.

Named “Oenotria” by the ancient Greeks for its abundance of grapevines, Italy has always had a culture that is virtually inextricable from wine. Wine grapes are grown just about everywhere throughout the country—a long and narrow boot-shaped peninsula extending into the Mediterranean and Adriatic Seas. The defining geographical feature of the country is the Apennine Mountain range, extending from Liguria in the north to Calabria in the south. The island of Sicily nearly grazes the toe of Italy’s boot, while Sardinia lies to the country’s west. Climate varies significantly throughout the country, with temperature being somewhat more dependent on elevation than latitude, though it is safe to generalize that the south is warmer. Much of the highest quality viticulture takes place on gently rolling, picturesque hillsides.

Italy boasts more indigenous varieties than any other country—between 500 and 800, depending on whom you ask—and most wine production relies upon these native grapes. In some regions, international varieties have worked their way in, but their use is declining in popularity, especially as younger growers begun to take interest in rediscovering forgotten local specialties. Sangiovese is the most widely planted variety in the country, reaching its greatest potential in parts of Tuscany. Nebbiolo is the prized grape of Piedmont in the northwest, producing singular and age-worthy wines at its best. Other important varieties include Montepulciano, Trebbiano, Barbera, Nero d’Avola, and of course, Pinot Grigio.

Other White Blends

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With hundreds of white grape varieties to choose from, winemakers have the freedom to create a virtually endless assortment of blended wines. In many European regions, strict laws are in place determining the set of varieties that may be used, but in the New World experimentation is permitted and encouraged. Blending can be utilized to create complex wines with many different layers of flavors and aromas, or to create more balanced wines. For example, a variety that is soft and full-bodied may be combined with one that is lighter with naturally high acidity. Sometimes small amounts of a particular variety are added to boost color or aromatics. Blending can take place before or after fermentation, with the latter, more popular option giving more control to the winemaker over the final qualities of the wine.

YNG222127_2009 Item# 133472

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