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Giuseppe Mascarello & Figlio Monprivato Barolo 2007

Nebbiolo from Barolo, Piedmont, Italy
  • RP97
  • WS96
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Winemaker Notes

#44 Wine Spectator Top 100 of 2012

Garnet red with orange-colored highlights. The nose is complex, very fruity, elegant, intense, spicy, with flowery sensations. Excellent body with power and stuffing, demanding, masculine, long and full.

Critical Acclaim

RP 97
The Wine Advocate

The 2007 Barolo Monprivato is stunningly beautiful. Monprivato is seldom this rich when it is young. It is most often intensely aromatic, mid-weight and frequently out of balance, especially right after bottling. The 2007 is none of those things. It is a rich, dramatic wine endowed with tons of fruit and a sweeping, enveloping personality. It is also primary and at the beginning of what is likely to be a long, long life. Despite its seeming fragility, Monprivato is one of the most long-lived of all Baroli, even in its weakest vintages. The 2007 is spectacular, but it is very, very young and in need of significant cellaring to shed some its baby fat. Purists may prefer the 2006. I have not tasted both wines side by side from bottle, but 10 years from now it won’t matter. Readers will be thrilled to own either. In 2007 Mascarello opted not to bottle his Riserva Ca’ d’Morissio as he didn’t think there was a huge difference between the Riserva and the straight Monprivato. I guess we will never know for sure, although my barrel tastings have always suggested otherwise. In any event, savvy readers know what happens when there is no Ca' d'Morissio in a good to great vintage. Recent examples include the 1999 and 2005. By now, its pretty clear the direction those wines have taken. Barolo lovers will not want to be without the 2007 Monprivato. It is a stratospheric Barolo in the making. Anticipated maturity: 2017-2037.

WS 96
Wine Spectator

A pure, ethereal Barolo, boasting rose, cherry and strawberry aromas and flavors, with a touch of tar. Very harmonious and elegant, with firm yet well-delineated tannins supporting the whole. Old-school and refined. Best from 2016 through 2035.

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Giuseppe Mascarello & Figlio

Giuseppe Mascarello & Figlio

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Giuseppe Mascarello & Figlio, , Italy
Giuseppe Mascarello & Figlio
Today, Mauro Mascarello is the last remaining giant of the great Barolo generation that included Giovanni Conterno and Bartolo Mascarello.

Mauro has been the winemaker for the Giuseppe Mascarello estate since the late 1960s, succeeding his father, Giuseppe, and his grandfather, Maurizio, both legends in their time. And like them, Mauro is a traditionalist dedicated to long fermentations and aging in old botti.

But Mauro has also made important changes, not the least of which was the creation of a single Barolo from the great Monprivato vineyard in 1970. Prior to that year, his family had always made their towering Barolos and Barolo Riservas by blending Monprivato fruit with grapes from other sites.

With a distinctly Mediterranean climate featuring warm days and cool nights, the Lodi AVA in California’s Central Valley provides growers with ideal conditions for grape-growing. As most of the rain falls in winter months while vines are dormant, the risk of disease and pest problems is low and irrigation can make up for the dry conditions during harvest.

By a wide margin, Zinfandel is the most successful and widely planted variety in Lodi. Often made from old vines, these wines are robust and fleshy with ripe, plummy fruit and represent excellent value at the lower end of the price spectrum. Over 100 other varieties are grown here, ranging from the classic (Merlot, Chardonnay) to the obscure and experimental (Portugal’s Touriga Nacional, France's Picqpoul).

Chardonnay

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One of the most popular and versatile white wine grapes, Chardonnay offers a wide range of flavors and styles depending on where it’s grown and how it’s made. In Burgundy, Chardonnay produces some of the finest white wines in the world, typically tending towards minimal intervention in the winery and at its best resulting in remarkable longevity. This grape is popular throughout the world, but perhaps its second most important home is in California, where both oaky, buttery styles and leaner, European-inspired wines enjoy great popularity. Oregon, Australia, South America, South Africa, and New Zealand are also significant producers of Chardonnay.

In the Glass

When planted on cool sites, Chardonnay’s flavors tend towards grapefruit, green apple, minerals, and white stone fruit, while warmer locations coax out richer, more tropical flavors of fig, melon, and pineapple. Oak can add notes of vanilla, coconut, and spice (as well as texture), while malolactic fermentation can impart soft, buttery acidity.

Perfect Pairings

Chardonnay is as versatile at the table as it is in the vineyard. The crisp, clean, Chablis-like styles go well with simple seafood, light chicken dishes, and salads. Richer Chardonnays marry well with cream or oil-based sauces.

Sommelier Secret

Since the 1990s, big, oaky, buttery Chardonnays from California have enjoyed explosive popularity. More recently, the pendulum has begun to swing in the opposite direction, towards a clean, crisp style that rarely utilizes new oak. These Old-World style wines have been dubbed the “New California Chardonnays,” and anyone who claims they do not like Chardonnay should give them a try.

PDX121184_2007 Item# 121184

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