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Fattoria Viticcio Toscana Bere 2009

Other Red Blends from Tuscany, Italy
  • WS90
  • JS90
13% ABV
  • JS92
  • JS90
  • WS87
  • RP87
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3.1 14 Ratings
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3.1 14 Ratings
13% ABV

Winemaker Notes

The color is a brilliant red. Aromas of red-berried fruit, and violets are present. On the palate excellent balance, freshness and pleasantness accompany notes of soft fruit and cherry, hints of violet. Iideal with pasta and pizza, it is recommended as an everyday wine.

Critical Acclaim

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WS 90
Wine Spectator
Boasting dark cherry and berry aromas and flavors, this polished red is vibrant and harmonious. Lingers on the finish, with a tight, fruit- and spice-filled aftertaste. Sangiovese, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. Best from 2013 through 2020. 2,000 cases imported.
JS 90
James Suckling
Lots of berry, chocolate and hints of cappuccino. Full and velvety, with plenty of fruit and a clean, bright finish. Delicious now. Good name for this. Drink it! Yummy. Made from 50% Sangiovese, 25% Cabernet Sauvignon, and 25% Merlot.
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Fattoria Viticcio

Fattoria Viticcio

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Fattoria Viticcio, , Italy
Fattoria Viticcio
Founded in 1960 by Lucio and Franca Landini, the Viticcio Estate still stands above the picturesque town of Greve, in the heart of the Chianti Classico region. Their focus is to produce high-quality wines worthy of an international clientele while at the same time respecting the traditions and viticulture of the region. This focus remains the same today under the direction of the second generation, Alessandro Landini.

The estate comprises more than 30 hectares of vines, all of which are farmed organically. Additionally, seven of those hectares are farmed biodynamically. Alessandro strongly believes that in order to produce high-quality wines you must first respect the land in which the vines are planted. To this end he uses no pesticides in his vineyards and fertilizes by planting things such as fava beans and barley between the rows of vines, allowing them to flower, and then plowing them back into the soil to add important nutrients. A handful of wines see some time in the smaller barriques, but the large majority is aged in large botti. The wines of Viticcio represent an important combination of traditional, time-honored techniques with modern-day technology and respect for the environment.

With a rich history of wine production dating back to biblical times, Israel is a part of the cradle of wine civilization. Here, wine was commonly used for religious ceremonies as well as for general consumption. During Roman times, it was a popular export, but during Islamic rule around 1300, production was virtually extinguished. The modern era of Israeli winemaking began in the late 19th century with help from Bordeaux’s Rothschild family. Accordingly, most grapes grown in Israel today are made from native French varieties. Indigenous varieties are all but extinct, though oenologists have made recent attempts to rediscover ancient varieties such as Marawi for commercial wine production.

In Israel’s Mediterranean climate, humidity and drought can be problematic, concentrating much of the country’s grape growing in the north near Galilee and at higher elevations in the east. The most successful red varieties are Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Syrah, while the best whites are made from Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc. Many, though by no means all Israeli wines are certified Kosher.

Cabernet Sauvignon

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A noble variety bestowed with both power and concentration, Cabernet Sauvignon is sometimes referred to as the “king” of red grapes. It can be somewhat unapproachable early in its youth but has the potential to age beautifully, with the ability to last fifty years or more at its best. Small berries and tough skins provide its trademark firm tannic grip, while high acidity helps to keep the wine fresh for decades. Cabernet Sauvignon flourishes in temperate climates like Bordeaux's Medoc region (and in St-Emillion and Pomerol, where it plays a supporting role to Merlot). The top Médoc producers use Cabernet Sauvignon for their wine’s backbone, blending it with Merlot and smaller amounts of Cabernet Franc, Malbec, and/or Petit Verdot. On its own, Cabernet Sauvignon has enjoyed great success throughout the world, particularly in the Napa Valley, and is responsible for some of the world’s most prestigious and sought-after “cult” wines.

In the Glass

High in color, tannin, and extract, Cabernet Sauvignon expresses notes of blackberry, cassis, plum, currant, spice, and tobacco. In Bordeaux and elsewhere in the Old World you'll find the more earthy, tannic side of Cabernet, where it's typically blended to soften tannins and add complexity. In warmer regions like California and Australia, you can typically expect more ripe fruit flavors upfront.

Perfect Pairings

Cabernet Sauvignon is right at home with rich, intense meat dishes—beef, lamb, and venison, in particular—where its opulent fruit and decisive tannins make an equal match to the dense protein of the meat. With a mature Cabernet, opt for tender, slow-cooked meat dishes.

Sommelier Secrets

Despite the modern importance and ubiquity of Cabernet Sauvignon, it is actually a relatively young variety. In 1997, DNA revealed the grape to be a spontaneous crossing of Cabernet Franc and Sauvignon Blanc which took place in 17th century southwestern France.

OPC60216_2009 Item# 113682

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