Processing Your Order...

Search for ""

Update your browser to enjoy all that Wine.com has to offer.

It's easy to update and using the latest version
of Internet Explorer means all your web browsing will be better.

Yes, Update Now
Flat front label of wine
Flat front label of wine

Dominique Roger Sancerre Domaine du Carrou Rose 2016

Rosé from Sancerre, Loire, France
    13% ABV
    All Vintages
    Currently Unavailable $25.99
    Try the 2017 Vintage 22 99
    25 99
    25 99
    Save $0.00 (0%)
    Ships Tomorrow
    Limit 0 bottles per customer
    Sold in increments of 0
    Add to Cart
    1
    Limit Reached
    0.0 0 Ratings
    My Wine Share
    Vintage Alert
    Alert me when new vintages are available
    Rate for better recommendations
    (256 characters remaining)
    Cancel Save

    0.0 0 Ratings
    13% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    A fresh Rose made from Pinot Noir. Scents of pollen from fruit trees give way to flavors of gooseberry, apricot and fresh butter. An excellent summer wine, it can be drunk at any time of the day Wonderuflly accompanies white meats, charcuterie, smoked salmon, and any summer or exotic menu.

    Critical Acclaim

    All Vintages
    Dominique Roger

    Dominique Roger

    View all wine
    Dominique Roger, Sancerre, Loire, France
    Image of winery
    The Roger family's roots in the Sancerre can be measured in centuries, with records showing the family residing in the region since the early 18th century. It was in 1950 that Dominique's father Maurice started Domaine du Carrou in one Sancerre's finest villages, Bue. This high altitude bastion of Sauvignon Blanc boasts all three of the regions famed soil types: terres blanches, caillotes, and an enviable percentage of silex.

    In the vineyards, Dominique chooses to work the soils constantly, allowing the roots to extend into the limestone mother rock. Herbicides and pesticides are never used and the grapes are only hand harvested (a practice that is becoming rarer and rarer in Sancerre).

    In the cellar, only indigenous yeasts are used and the wines are aged in tank to preserve the mineral cut of these privileged vineyards. The dedication put forth by the Roger family has vaulted to the upper echelons of the region. Domaine du Carrou is consistently ranked as one of the top producers in all of Sancerre by La Revue du Vin de France and other French publications.

    Sancerre

    View all wine

    Marked by its charming hilltop village in the easternmost territory of the Loire, Sancerre is famous for its racy, vivacious, citrus-dominant Sauvignon blanc. Its enormous popularity in 1970s French bistros led to its success as the go-to restaurant white around the globe in the 1980s.

    While the region claims a continental climate, noted for short, hot summers and long, cold winters, variations in topography—rolling hills and steep slopes from about 600 to 1,300 feet in elevation—with great soil variations, contribute the variations in character in Sancerre Sauvignon blancs.

    In the western part of the appellation, clay and limestone soils with Kimmeridgean marne, especially in Chavignol, produce powerful wines. Moving closer to the actual town of Sancerre, soils are gravel and limestone, producing especially delicate wines. Flint (silex) soils close to the village produce particularly perfumed and age-worthy wines.

    About ten percent of the wines claiming the Sancerre appellation name are fresh and light red wines made from Pinot noir and to a lesser extent, rosés. While not typically exported in large amounts, they are well-made and attract a loyal French following.

    Rosé Wine

    View all wine

    Whether it’s playful and fun or savory and serious, most rosé today is not your grandmother’s White Zinfandel, though that category remains strong. Pink wine has recently become quite trendy, and this time around it’s commonly quite dry. It is produced throughout the world from a vast array of grape varieties, but the most successful sources are California, southern France (particularly Provence), and parts of Spain and Italy.

    Since the pigment in red wines comes from keeping fermenting juice in contact with the grape skins for an extended period, it follows that a pink wine can be made using just a brief period of skin contact—usually just a couple of days. The resulting color will depend on the grape variety and the winemaking style, ranging from pale salmon to deep magenta. These wines are typically fresh and fruity, fermented at cool temperatures in stainless steel to preserve the primary aromas and flavors. Most rosé, with a few notable exceptions, should be drunk rather young, within a few years of the vintage.

    SRKFRG006_2016 Item# 295080