Processing Your Order...

Search for ""

Update your browser to enjoy all that Wine.com has to offer.

It's easy to update and using the latest version
of Internet Explorer means all your web browsing will be better.

Yes, Update Now
Flat front label of wine
Flat front label of wine

Didier Dagueneau Blanc Fume de Pouilly Silex 2011

Sauvignon Blanc from Pouilly-Fume, Loire, France
  • RP93
0% ABV
  • RP93
  • WS94
  • W&S94
All Vintages
Currently Unavailable $109.00
Try the
109
109
Save $0.00 (0%)
Ships Mon, Dec 17
Limit 0 bottles per customer
Sold in increments of 0
Add to Cart
0
Limit Reached
0.0 0 Ratings
My Wine Share
Vintage Alert
Alert me when new vintages are available
Rate for better recommendations
(256 characters remaining)
Cancel Save

0.0 0 Ratings
0% ABV

Winemaker Notes

This is considered to be Dagueneau's "Grand Cru", if you will. The incremental changes made in both the winery and vineyards over the years and more recently by Benjamin Dagueneau have come together with a vintage that could best express what he was trying to say. Aromatic ripeness without high alcohol. Massive mineral concentration that will yield over time and marry perfectly with the high-toned fruit components and barrel and bottle complexity that seem in perfect harmony. The most young and backward of the bunch (as usual), this wine has massive acidity that provides the perfect balance to the mineral profile that is so prevalent in the mouth. No shortage of fruit, but for the time being, this wine is all about structure and potential. Sit back and marvel at what the years have in store for this wine, and make sure you save some.

Critical Acclaim

All Vintages
RP 93
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
A delightfully, pungently intense bouquet of hedge flowers and resinous herbs rises from the glass of Dagueneau 2011 Blanc Fume de Pouilly Silex, anticipating the bittersweet presence of herbal essences and inner-mouth floral perfume that are allied to nut and citrus oils on a dense, subtly oleaginous palate. This finishes with an authoritative sense of grip and I expect it will not only perform well for a decade but benefit from being left alone for the first several years in bottle.

Range: 92-93+ Points

View More
Didier Dagueneau

Didier Dagueneau

View all wine
Didier Dagueneau, Pouilly-Fume, Loire, France
Image of winery
There are few winemakers in history as bullish or brazen, roguish or renegade, as the Loire Valley's Didier Dagueneau. High-standards, incredible risk-taking, impeccable attention to detail, zealous allegiance to his terroir, and a willingness to take a stand against convention made this once-professional motorcycle sidecar racer the stuff of legends. Born in the Nievre, where Burgundy meets the Loire Valley, Didier was the fourth generation in a family of winegrowers. In 1982, just after returning to his native village of Saint Andelain just outside of Pouilly-sur-Loire, Didier set his new career as winemaker in motion, and in typical form, there were no half-measures. Influenced by wine legend Henri Jayer of Burgundy, his grandfather Louis Dagueneau, Andre Chabanne of Pouilly-sur-Loire, enologist Denis Dubourdieux of Bordeaux, and Professor Renaud of the Pasteur Institut in Paris, Didier quickly found his own style. By fusing modern winemaking with ultra-traditional methods of vineyard management, he was able to realize the ultimate expression of terroir and technique.

However dare-devilish in both winemaking and in life, Didier's untimely death in a plane crash in 2008 shook the wine community to its core. Fortunately for all who love Didier's wines, his oldest son, Louis-Benjamin, is now steering the domaine with the audacity, passion and talent that many critics and wine-lovers agree equal those of his father. Didier's were no small shoes to fill, but Louis-Benjamin, now with several harvests under his belt, has more than proven to be up to the task. In fact, he and his sister, Charlotte, have brought new energy to an enterprise that was already considered at the top of its game. While the solar panels on the winery roof are indicative that the younger Dagueneaus are reaching for new heights, tasting the 2008, 2009 and 2010 vintages is proof that they are on a path that their father would have approved. Louis-Benjamin is a force in both the vineyards and the cellars. If this is what we can expect from this young man after only a handful of solo vintages, we can only imagine the new heights to which the domaine will soar! Didier would be proud.

Pouilly-Fume

View all wine

Famous in the Loire and throughout the world for perfumed Sauvignon blanc, Pouilly-Fume sits due east, across the Loire River from Sancerre. Limestone soils with clay and flint (also called silex) contribute to the wines' freshness and often times smoky, flinty, mineral character.

Sauvignon Blanc

View all wine

A crisp, refreshing variety that equally reflects both terroir and varietal character, Sauvignon blanc is responsible for a vast array of wine styles. However, a couple of commonalities always exist—namely, zesty acidity and intense aromatics. The variety is of French provenance, and here is most important in Bordeaux and the Loire Valley. It also shines in New Zealand, California, Australia and parts of northeastern Italy. Chile and South Africa are excellent sources of high-quality, value-priced Sauvignon blanc.

In the Glass

From its homeland In Bordeaux, winemakers prefer to blend it with Sémillon to produce a softer, richer style. In the Loire Valley, it expresses citrus, flint and smoky flavors, especially from in Sancerre and Pouilly-Fume. Marlborough, New Zealand often produces a pungent and racy version, often reminiscent of cut grass, gooseberry and grapefruit. California produces fruity and rich oak-aged versions as well as snappy and fresh, Sauvignon blancs, which never see any oak.

Perfect Pairings

The freshness of Sauvignon Blanc’s flavor lends it to a range of light, summery dishes including salad, seafood and mild Asian cuisine. Sauvignon Blanc settles in comfortably at the table with notoriously difficult foods like artichokes or asparagus. When combined with Sémillon (and perhaps some oak), it can be paired with more complex seafood and chicken dishes.

Sommelier Secret

Along with Cabernet Franc, Sauvignon Blanc is the proud parent of Cabernet Sauvignon. That green bell pepper aroma that all three varieties share is no coincidence—it comes from a high concentration of pyrazines (an herbaceous aromatic compound) inherent to each member of the family.

BEA52411_2011 Item# 131964