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Dal Forno Romano Monte Lodoletta Amarone della Valpolicella 2008

Other Red Blends from Valpolicella, Veneto, Italy
  • JS97
  • RP95
  • WS94
  • D94
  • WE90
750ML / 16.5% ABV
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  • WS95
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750ML / 16.5% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Subtle aromatic hints, that range from black cherry, blueberry to chocolate, anticipate the opulent expression of mature fruit that flows into the mouth with inadvertent persistence. Nuances of truffle, tobacco and new leather wrap around the finish.

In order to create this wine, the finest bunches of grapes are selected, after which a meticulous manual control is carried out to eliminate all grapes that do not meet the standards required. The selected grapes are then placed in plastic plateaux and are then left to rest for 90 days in large open rooms, where an innovative ventilation system helps maintain an elevated and thorough air flow.

Fermentation takes place in steel tanks at a controlled temperature of around 28°, which are equipped with a sophisticated computerized system which allows for automated punching for a period of around 15 days, including the final maceration which takes two days.

After decantation in the middle of January, the Amarone, which still contains some residual sugar, is placed into new barriques, where it begins a slow fermentation process which will last for a further 18 months. The total amount of time that it remains in the barriques is 36 months.

Blend: 60% Corvina, 20% Rondinella, 10% Croatina, 10% Oseleta

Critical Acclaim

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JS 97
James Suckling
Wonderful aromas of rose petal, blackberry, sugared walnut and hints of sea salt. Full body, ultra-fine tannins and a warm, enticing palate with dried fruits, blackberry, black olive and freshly cracked slate. Fabulous Amarone.
RP 95
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
To be released in early 2014, the 2008 Amarone della Valpolicella (with fruit sourced from the high density Monte Lodoletta vineyard) opens with immense darkness and the kind of midnight impenetrability you never see on any color wheel for fine wine. Its off the charts appearance is followed by similarly unique aromatic intensity and versatility that spans from blackberry syrup and candied prune to chewing tobacco, black peppercorn and rain-soaked asphalt. This is but a baby that will require loads of time in your cellar before it enters its prime drinking window. Because Dal Forno did not make Amarone in 2007, the wait will seem that much longer. Having said that, this wine is very different from the 2006 Amarone despite the fact 2006 and 2008 were relatively similar cool vintages overall. I distinctly remember the impossible tightness and astringency of the tannins in 2006 when tasted at the same young stage in the wine’s life. The 2008 Amarone, on the other hand, is much softer and a tad more approachable in contrast. Ultimately, this wine promises a graceful, steady and long evolution. Drink: 2017-2035.
WS 94
Wine Spectator
Game and ashy smoke details lead the way in this ripe red, followed by juicy plumped cherry, date, dark chocolate and woodsy spice notes on the plush-textured palate. Velvety tannins give this some brawn, but this is beautifully knit and balanced, showing an overall sense of finesse. Delivers a lasting finish of fruit and spice. Drink now through 2033.
D 94
Decanter
This is a lighter, more elegant style from Dal Forno, reflecting the cooler vintage conditions in 2008. The juicy palate is balanced by a wonderful level of structure, with slightly generic but ripe plum and hedgerow fruit with violet lift. A textural mid-palate leads onto a creamy cherry fruit finish. Drinking Window 2018 - 2040.
WE 90
Wine Enthusiast
Dense and extracted, this conveys aromas of Asian spice, prune, raisin, black pepper and espresso. The concentrated, thick palate delivers black plum, raisin, blueberry extract and crème brûlée alongside smooth tannins and soft acidity. The heat of evident alcohol and syrupy texture would make this a nice wine that inspires meditation.
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Dal Forno Romano

Dal Forno Romano

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Dal Forno Romano, Italy
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This family winery is located in Val d’Illasi where the Dal Forno have owned prime vineyards for fourth generation. Luigi DalForno was well known for the quality of his wines and his grandson Romano has carried on the traditions since 1983, when he took over the running of the Estate. In 1990 a new winery was built, it uses modern technologies while maintaining the traditions of these famous wines.

The great richness of Dal Forno's wines is derived from the extremely low yields of this artisan’s 12.5-hectare estate outside the Classico zone. His dense, creamy Valpolicella is among the best of the Veneto, and his 'Nettare' is part of the comeback of garganega, the grape behind Soave that we find here formally dressed as a white passito dessert wine.

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Valpolicella

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Among the ranks of Italy’s quintessential red wines, Valpolicella literally translates to the “valley of cellars” and is composed of a series of valleys (named Fumane, Marano and Negrare) that start in the pre-alpine Lissini Mountains and end in the southern plains of the Veneto. Here vineyards adorn the valley hillsides, rising up to just over 1,300 feet.

The classification of its red wines makes this appellation unique. Whereas most Italian regions claim the wines from one or two grapes as superior, or specific vineyards or communes most admirable, Valpolicella ranks the caliber of its red wines based on delimited production methods, and every tier uses the same basic blending grapes.

Corvina holds the most esteem among varieties here and provides the backbone of the best reds of Valpolicella. Also typical in the blends, in lesser quantities, are Rondinella, Molinara, Oseleta, Croatina, Corvinone and a few other minor red varieties.

Valpolicella Classico, the simplest category, is where the region’s top values are found and resembles in style light and fruity Beaujolais. The next tier of reds, called Valpolicella Superiore, represents a darker and more serious and concentrated expression of Valpolicella, capable of pairing with red meat, roast poultry and hard cheeses.

Most prestigious in Valpolicella are the dry red, Amarone della Valpolicella, and its sweet counterpart, Recioto della Valpolicella. Both are created from harvested grapes left to dry for three to five months before going to press, resulting in intensely rich, lush, cerebral and cellar-worthy wines.

Falling in between Valpolicella Superiore and Amarone is a style called Valpolicella Ripasso, which has become immensely popular only since the turn of the century. Ripasso literally means “repassed” and is made by macerating fresh Valpolicella on the pressed grape skins of Amarone. As a result, a Ripasso will have more depth and complexity compared to a regular Superiore but is more approachable than an Amarone.

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Other Red Blends

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With hundreds of red grape varieties to choose from, winemakers have the freedom to create a virtually endless assortment of blended wines. In many European regions, strict laws are in place determining the set of varieties that may be used, but in the New World, experimentation is permitted and encouraged. Blending can be utilized to enhance balance or create complexity, lending different layers of flavors and aromas. For example, a variety that creates a fruity and full-bodied wine would do well combined with one that is naturally high in acidity and tannins. Sometimes small amounts of a particular variety are added to boost color or aromatics. Blending can take place before or after fermentation, with the latter, more popular option giving more control to the winemaker over the final qualities of the wine.

WDW10000910152408_2008 Item# 417502