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Coppo Chardonnay Coste Bianche 2001

Chardonnay from Piedmont, Italy
    0% ABV
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    0% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    Pale yellow with golden reflections. Bouquet of lemon accented by light vanilla and spice. Soft and somewhat buttery on palate with toasty oak nuances and a long, pleasant finish. A very versatile wine recommended with dishes ranging from antipasti through beef cooked in red wine sauces.

    100% Chardonnay

    Critical Acclaim

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    Coppo
    Coppo, Italy
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    Piero Coppo founded the winery in 1892 in the town of Canelli, in Piedmont, establishing himself as a top producer of Moscato. Piero was succeeded by his son Luigi, who expanded the company to include other classic still and sparkling wines from Piedmont, made with the native varietals of the area. Luigi also provided his winery with the facilities and equipments needed to compete in the difficult, but growing, post-war market. Today, Piero's four grandsons manage the company, successfully integrating new styles with traditional viticulture.

    Just after the loss of their father Luigi in 1984, the brothers decided to focus on Barbera, releasing their own interpretation of this local grape. The prestigious Pomorosso was born, emerging as the model of the "Modern Style" Barbera, aged in oak and with unmistakable personality. Barbera, a truly native varietal, soon became the pride of the entire region.

    The four brothers Piero, Gianni, Paolo and Roberto have set an ambitious goal: to resurrect the traditional red varietals from the Asti region, and to produce serious white wines with aging potential. This is a new generation of winegrowers with a new way of viewing agriculture. Although they are considered to be "Barbera specialists", they also produce an outstanding Moscato d'Asti and an excellent Gavi.

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    Piedmont

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    Set upon a backdrop of the visually stunning Alps, the enchanting and rolling hills of Piedmont are the source of some of the country’s longest-lived and most sought-after wines. Vineyards cover a great majority of the land area—especially in Barolo—with the most prized sites at the top hilltops or on south-facing slopes where sunlight exposure is maximized. Piedmont has a continental climate with hot, humid summers leading to cold winters and precipitation year-round. The reliable autumnal fog provides a cooling effect, especially beneficial for Nebbiolo, Piedmont’s most prestigious variety.

    In fact, Nebbiolo is named exactly for the arrival of this pre-harvest fog (called “nebbia” in Italian), which prolongs cluster hang time and allows full phenolic balance and ripeness. Harvest of Nebbiolo is last among Piedmont's varieties, occurring sometime in October. This grape is responsible for the exalted wines of Barbaresco and Barolo, known for their ageability, firm tannins and hallmark aromas of tar and roses. Nebbiolo wines, despite their pale hue, pack a pleasing punch of flavor and structure; the best examples can require about a decade’s wait before they become approachable. Barbaresco tends to be more elegant in style while Barolo is more powerful. Across the Tanaro River, the Roero region, and farther north, the regions of Gattinara and Ghemme, also produce excellent quality Nebbiolo.

    Easy-going Barbera is the most planted grape in Piedmont, beloved for its trademark high acidity, low tannin and juicy red fruit. Dolcetto, Piedmont’s other important red grape, is usually ready within a couple of years of release.

    White wines, while less ubiquitous here, should not be missed. Key varieties include Arneis, Cortese, Timorasso, Erbaluce and the sweet, charming Muscat, responsible for the brilliantly recognizable, Moscato d'Asti.

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    Chardonnay

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    One of the most popular and versatile white wine grapes, Chardonnay offers a wide range of flavors and styles depending on where it is grown and how it is made. While practically every country in the wine producing world grows it, Chardonnay from its Burgundian homeland produces some of the most remarkable and longest lived examples. As far as cellar potential, white Burgundy rivals the world’s other age-worthy whites like Riesling or botrytized Semillon. California is Chardonnay’s second most important home, where both oaky, buttery styles and leaner, European-inspired wines enjoy great popularity. Oregon, Australia and South America are also significant producers of Chardonnay.

    In the Glass

    When planted on cool sites, Chardonnay flavors tend towards grapefruit, lemon zest, green apple, celery leaf and wet flint, while warmer locations coax out richer, more tropical flavors of melon, peach and pineapple. Oak can add notes of vanilla, coconut and spice, while malolactic fermentation imparts a soft and creamy texture.

    Perfect Pairings

    Chardonnay is as versatile at the table as it is in the vineyard. The crisp, clean, Chablis-like styles go well with flaky white fish with herbs, scallops, turkey breast and soft cheeses. Richer Chardonnays marry well with lobster, crab, salmon, roasted chicken and creamy sauces.

    Sommelier Secret

    Since the 1990s, big, oaky, buttery Chardonnays from California have enjoyed explosive popularity. More recently, the pendulum has begun to swing in the opposite direction, towards a clean, crisp style that rarely utilizes new oak. In Burgundy, the subregion of Chablis, while typically employing the use of older oak barrels, produces a similar bright and acid-driven style. Anyone who doesn't like oaky Chardonnay would likely enjoy its lighter style.

    NWL317175_2001 Item# 57036