Processing Your Order...

New Customers Save $30 off $100+* with code SEPTNEW30

New Customers Save $30* with code SEPTNEW30

*New customers only. Order must be placed by 9/22/2017. The $30 discount is given for a single order with a minimum of $100 excluding shipping and tax. Items with pricing ending in .97 are excluded and will not count toward the minimum required. Discount does not apply to corporate orders, gift certificates, or StewardShip membership fees. No other promotion codes, coupon codes or corporate discounts may be applied to order.

Due to state regulations, we cannot ship wine to California

Clos Les Lunelles Cotes de Castillon 2004

Bordeaux Red Blends from Cotes de Castillon, Bordeaux, France
  • RP92
Ships Wed, Sep 27
Limit 0 bottles per customer
Sold in increments of 0
Currently Unavailable $34.99
Try the
34 99
34 99
Save $0.00 (0%)
Add to Cart
1
Alert me when new vintages are available
Rate for better recommendations
No Rating

Winemaker Notes

The grapes are picked and sorted by hand, and alcoholic fermentation istriggered by indigenous yeast in temperature-controlled cement vats. Thewine stays on the skins for 5 weeks. Malolactic fermentation in barrel.

Clos des Lunelles is aged in new oak barrels for 18 to 24 months with rackingevery 3 months. The finial blend is made just before bottling, without finingor filtering.

Critical Acclaim

RP 92
The Wine Advocate

Perhaps the biggest sleeper of the vintage, the amazing 2004 Clos les Lunelles (owned by Chantal and Gerard Perse) is made from 38-year-old Merlot (80%) and Cabernet Sauvignon (20%) with a touch of Cabernet Franc included in the blend. This Cotes de Castillon vineyard receives the same treatment as Perse’s other properties in St.-Emilion, including one or two deleafings (depending on the vintage conditions) as well as several crop-thinnings (yields were 20 hectoliters per hectare in 2004). The result is a dark ruby/purple-tinged wine boasting fabulous aromas of blackberries, cherries, pain grille, spring flowers, and forest floor. Textured, full-bodied, and fleshy, it tastes like a top classified growth rather than an obscure Cotes de Castillon. Sadly, production is only 1,700 cases.

View More
Clos Les Lunelles

Clos Les Lunelles

View all wine
Clos Les Lunelles, , France - Bordeaux
Clos Les Lunelles
In 2001, Chateau Lapeyronie, now known as Clos Les Lunelles, came out of relative obscurity with the help of Gérard Perse's "magic wand" (according to Robert Parker's expression). This small (8.5 hectare) Cotes de Castillon estate proved its incredible potential by earning a 93-100 mark from the famous American wine critic for Perse's first vintage. Beginning in 1999 with the purchase of Château Clos L'Eglise and Chateau Sainte Colombe, which borders on Clos Les Lunelles, Gérard Perse's hugely successful involvement in the long underestimated Cotes de Castillon appellation is clearly another feather in his cap.

A source of reliable, budget-friendly wines and, increasingly, more premium bottlings, Chile is one of South America’s most important wine-producing countries. Long and thin, it is largely isolated geographically, bordered by the Pacific Ocean to the west, the Andes Mountains to the east, and the Atacama desert to the north. These natural borders gave Chile the very favorable benefit of being the only country to avoid the disastrous phylloxera infestation of the late 1800s. As a result, vines can be planted on their own rootstock rather than grafted. Though viticulture was introduced to the country by conquistadors from Spain, today Chile’s wine production is most influenced by the French, who emigrated here in large numbers to escape the blight of phylloxera. These settlers have invested heavily in local vineyards and wineries.

Chile’s vineyards, planted mainly with international varieties, vary widely in climate and soil type from north to south. The Coquimbo region in the far north contains the Elqui and Limari Valleys, where minimal rainfall and intense sunlight are offset by chilly breezes from the Humboldt current to produce cool-climate Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. The Aconcagua region contains the eponymous Aconcagua Valley—hot and dry and home to full-bodied red wines made from Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah, and Merlot—as well as Casablanca Valley and San Antonio Valley, which focus on light-bodied Pinot Noir and cool-climate whites like Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc. The Central Valley is home to the Maipo, Rapel, Curicó, and Maule Valleys, which produce a wide variety of red and white wines. Maipo in particular is known for Carmenère, Chile’s unofficial signature grape. In the up-and-coming southern regions of Bio Bio and Itata, excellent cool-climate Riesling, Chardonnay, and Pinot Noir are made.

Cabernet Sauvignon

View all wine

A noble variety bestowed with both power and concentration, Cabernet Sauvignon is sometimes referred to as the “king” of red grapes. It can be somewhat unapproachable early in its youth but has the potential to age beautifully, with the ability to last fifty years or more at its best. Small berries and tough skins provide its trademark firm tannic grip, while high acidity helps to keep the wine fresh for decades. Cabernet Sauvignon flourishes in temperate climates like Bordeaux's Medoc region (and in St-Emillion and Pomerol, where it plays a supporting role to Merlot). The top Médoc producers use Cabernet Sauvignon for their wine’s backbone, blending it with Merlot and smaller amounts of Cabernet Franc, Malbec, and/or Petit Verdot. On its own, Cabernet Sauvignon has enjoyed great success throughout the world, particularly in the Napa Valley, and is responsible for some of the world’s most prestigious and sought-after “cult” wines.

In the Glass

High in color, tannin, and extract, Cabernet Sauvignon expresses notes of blackberry, cassis, plum, currant, spice, and tobacco. In Bordeaux and elsewhere in the Old World you'll find the more earthy, tannic side of Cabernet, where it's typically blended to soften tannins and add complexity. In warmer regions like California and Australia, you can typically expect more ripe fruit flavors upfront.

Perfect Pairings

Cabernet Sauvignon is right at home with rich, intense meat dishes—beef, lamb, and venison, in particular—where its opulent fruit and decisive tannins make an equal match to the dense protein of the meat. With a mature Cabernet, opt for tender, slow-cooked meat dishes.

Sommelier Secrets

Despite the modern importance and ubiquity of Cabernet Sauvignon, it is actually a relatively young variety. In 1997, DNA revealed the grape to be a spontaneous crossing of Cabernet Franc and Sauvignon Blanc which took place in 17th century southwestern France.

VCC101824_2004 Item# 101824

Update your browser to enjoy all that Wine.com has to offer.

It's easy to update and using the latest version
of Internet Explorer means all your web browsing will be better.

Yes, Update Now