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Chateau Couhins-Lurton Blanc (Futures Pre-Sale) 2011

Bordeaux White Blends from Pessac-Leognan, Bordeaux, France
  • WS93
13% ABV
Pre-sale: Ships at a later date
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Currently Unavailable $24.99
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13% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Critical Acclaim

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WS 93
Wine Spectator
A really crackling style, with mouthwatering herb, fleur de sel and gooseberry notes leading the way and a core of white peach in reserve. This is superbrisk and refreshing, and should age a bit too.
Barrel Sample: 90-93 Points
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Chateau Couhins-Lurton

Chateau Couhins-Lurton

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Chateau Couhins-Lurton, , France - Bordeaux
Chateau Couhins-Lurton
Known in the late 17th century under the name "Bourdieu de La Gravette", the Couhins estate belonged to Maître Alphonse Banchereau, a famous Bordeaux lawyer. The size of the estate was virtually identical to what it is today: ten hectares of farmland and vineyards on the finest gravelly rises in the parish of Villenave d’Ornon.

In the meanwhile, in 1972, André Lurton had acquired a beautiful section of the vineyard from INRA, effectively dividing the great growth in two. In 1992, André Lurton purchased the château, the cellars, the outbuildings and the beautiful grounds from Monsieur and Madame Conte, thereby completing the creation of Château Couhins Lurton.

The grounds and gardens were designed in the 19th century by the famous landscape artist Lebreton. These have now recovered their former splendour thanks to the Bordeaux architect Anouck Debarre. In September 2002, the first red wine grapes, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, from a beautiful plot with gravel soil, were brought to be crushed in Couhins-Lurton's brand new cellar. A tradition going back more than a century was thus reborn.

A large and diverse wine region in northeastern Italy, the Veneto is home to a vast array of different styles of wine. With no defining regional characteristics, it can be a bit confusing to the general consumer to parse through its many subzones, but the patient wine lover will find many treasures to be discovered here, typically at wallet-friendly prices. Red and white wines are produced here, with more emphasis on the latter, as well as the ultra-popular sparkling wine Prosecco. The region is sheltered from harsh northern European winters by the Alps, which form its northern border, but the climate is still relatively cool, making the Veneto ideal for white wine production.

Much of Italy’s Pinot Grigio hails from the Veneto, where it can range from neutral and inoffensive to crisp and refreshing. Soave, made primarily from the Garganega grape, has a reputation for producing relatively ordinary, bulk wines, but can be very elegant when yields are carefully monitored, with aromas of lemon, almond, and white flowers. Valpolicella is the region’s best-known red wine, with juicy, tart red cherry flavors derived from the Corvina grape. Recioto and Amarone wines made from dried grapes are a regional specialty and can be very intense, heady, and cerebral.

Pinot Gris/Grigio

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One grape variety with two very distinct personas, Pinot Gris in France is rich, round, and aromatic, while Pinot Grigio in Italy is simple, crisp, and refreshing. In Italy, Pinot Grigio is grown in the mountainous regions of Trentino, Friuli, and Alto Adige in the northeast. In France it reaches its apex in Alsace. Pinots both “Gris” and “Grigio” are produced successfully in Oregon's Willamette Valley as well as parts of California, and are widely planted throughout central and eastern Europe.

In the Glass

Pinot Gris is naturally low in acidity, so full ripeness is necessary to achieve and showcase its signature flavors and aromas of stone fruit, citrus, honeysuckle, pear, and almond skin. Alsatian styles are aromatic, richly textured and often relatively high in alcohol. As Pinot Grigio in Italy, the style is much more subdued, light, simple, and easy to drink.

Perfect Pairings

Alsace is renowned for its potent food–pork, foie gras, and charcuterie. With its viscous nature, Pinot Gris fits in harmoniously with these heavy hitters. Pinot Grigio, on the other hand, with its lean, crisp, citrusy freshness, works better with simple salads, a wide range of seafood, and subtle chicken dishes.

Sommelier Secret

Outside of France and Italy, the decision by the producer whether to label as “Gris” or “Grigio” serves as a strong indicator as to the style of wine in the bottle—the former will typically be a richer, more serious rendition while the latter will be bright, fresh, and fun.

BEYCOUHINS_2011 Item# 118677

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