Chateau Beauregard (Futures Pre-Sale) 2018  Front Label
Chateau Beauregard (Futures Pre-Sale) 2018  Front LabelChateau Beauregard (Futures Pre-Sale) 2018  Front Bottle Shot

Chateau Beauregard (Futures Pre-Sale) 2018

  • RP95
  • JS94
  • WS93
  • D92
  • JD92
750ML / 0% ABV
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  • WE93
  • WS93
  • JS93
  • JD91
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Winemaker Notes

Critical Acclaim

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RP 95
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
Viticulture at Beauregard is organic, as at the sister property Smith Haut Lafitte, but Beauregard only lost about 15% of the crop to mildew. Composed of 75% Merlot and 25% Cabernet Franc, the deep garnet-purple colored 2018 Beauregard develops slowly to reveal a core of blackberry compote, plum preserves and blueberry pie with touches of smoked meats, tobacco, baking spices, yeast extract and fragrant earth. Full, rich, velvety and packed with rich, expressive black fruit preserves, it has plenty of freshness, finishing long and spicy.
Barrel Sample: 93-95
JS 94
James Suckling

Very pretty and refined with a lovely core of ripe fruit and chocolate. Hints of cedar. Medium body, fine tannins and a juicy finish.

Barrel Sample: 93-94

WS 93
Wine Spectator

Lovely dark plum, warm cassis and boysenberry puree flavors glide through. Very caressing in feel.

Barrel Sample: 90-93

D 92
Decanter

There is lots of density here but it shows a lovely supple side to the fruits with intense damson and black cherry alongside swirls of chocolate and a patisserie choux bun touch of gentle creaminess. A good job, and a wine that’s easy to approach with a build through the palate joined by layers of tannins that are a little deceptive. Barrel Sample: 92

JD 92
Jeb Dunnuck

The 2018 Château Beauregard is a deep, concentrated Pomerol that’s going to benefit from bottle age. Classic notes of dark fruits, toasted spiced, roasted herbs and cedar all give way to a medium to full-bodied 2018 that offers a big mid-palate, nicely integrated acidity, and ripe tannins. It’s a touch primordial, but it has class and balance and is going to come together beautifully in bottle. The blend of the 2018 is 75% Merlot and 25% Cabernet Franc. Barrel Sample: 90-92.

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Chateau Beauregard

Chateau Beauregard

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Chateau Beauregard, France
Chateau Beauregard Winery Image
The history of Chateau Beauregard can be traced back to the 12th century and the Knights Hospitaliers of St John of Jerusalem. They were active in the Pomerol area and owned a small manoir on this very site. On these ruins the De Beauregard family constructed a rather grander edifice five centuries later. It was this building, eventually rather dilapidated, which was replaced by the present day chateau in Napoleonic times.

By the middle of the 8th century the property had been inherited by Jérome de Chaussade de Chandos. Beauregard was not the main residence of this gentleman, who had a larger estate at Rauzan in the Entre-Deux-Mers, but his son Luc-Jermé did live here from 1755 to 1769, and it is at this period that the land was transformed from polyculture to viticulture. In 1741, according to Enjalbert, there were two journeaux of vines at Beauregard; by the revolution there were 18 (6.3 hectares). Luc-Jermé Chaussade was a friend of Jacques Kanon (of what was to become Canon in Saint-Emilion) and shared his enthusiasm for the new fashion of serious vineyard husbandry. In his hands Beauregard became one of the first of the Pomerol estates to be vinously expanded. By the time the Revolutionary Convention abolished primogeniture in 1793 Luc-Jermé had been succeeded by his son Jermé, a young man who had three sisters. Seeing his inheritance about to be quartered he put his share of Beauregard up for sale and persuaded his sisters to do likewise. It fetched 110,000 livres (a high price, justified only on the grounds of the reputation of the wine) on 3rd July 1793 and passed into the hands of Bonaventure Berthomieux. Despite his somewhat Italian christian name Berthomieux was a prominent and wealthy citizen of a well-established Saint-Emilion family He was a merchant who dealt in grain as well as wine, and he looked after his brother's estate in Fronsac as well as his own. In 1854 Beauregard was sold to M. Durand-Desgranges. Restoration was swift. Durand-Desgranges, a local courtier (broker), replanted the vineyard, extended it to 14 hectares, and by the second edition of Cocks and Féret in 1868 had raised its eminence to 13th place in the Pomerol hierarchy. The Durand-Desgranges family remained at Beauregard until 1920. After a brief interregnum in the hands of the brothers Chavaroche the estate was acquired by a local lawyer, M. Brulé, on behalf of his god-daughter Henriette Giraud in 1922. Henriette's father was Savinien Giraud, owner of Thotanoy and she was wedded to Raymond Clauzel of the family which owned Chateau La Tour de Mons in Soussans. The four children remained owners of Chateau Beauregard until March 1991 when they sold the estate and today it is owned by Foncier Vignobles.

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Pomerol Wine

Bordeaux, France

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A source of exceptionally sensual and glamorous red wines, Pomerol is actually a rather small appellation in an unassuming countryside. It sits on a plateau immediately northeast of the city of Libourne on the right bank of the Dordogne River. Pomerol and St-Émilion are the stars of what is referred to as Right Bank Bordeaux: Merlot-dominant red blends completed by various amounts of Cabernet Franc or Cabernet Sauvignon. While Pomerol has no official classification system, its best wines are some of the world’s most sought after.

Historically Pomerol attached itself to the larger and more picturesque neighboring region of St-Émilion until the late 1800s when discerning French consumers began to recognize the quality and distinction of Pomerol on its own. Its popularity spread to northern Europe in the early 1900s.

After some notable vintages of the 1940s, the Pomerol producer, Petrus, began to achieve great international attention and brought widespread recognition to the appellation. Its subsequent distribution by the successful Libourne merchant, Jean-Pierre Mouiex, magnified Pomerol's fame after the Second World War.

Perfect for Merlot, the soils of Pomerol—clay on top of well-drained subsoil—help to create wines capable of displaying an unprecedented concentration of color and flavor.

The best Pomerol wines will be intensely hued, with qualities of fresh wild berries, dried fig or concentrated black plum preserves. Aromas may be of forest floor, sifted cocoa powder, anise, exotic spice or toasted sugar and will have a silky, smooth but intense texture.

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One of the world’s most classic and popular styles of red wine, Bordeaux-inspired blends have spread from their homeland in France to nearly every corner of the New World, especially in California, Washington and Australia. Typically based on either Cabernet Sauvignon or Merlot and supported by Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot, these are sometimes referred to in the US as “Meritage” blends. In Bordeaux itself, Cabernet Sauvignon dominates in wines from the Left Bank of the Gironde River, while the Right Bank focuses on Merlot. Often, blends from outside the region are classified as being inspired by one or the other.

Tasting Notes for Bordeaux Blends

Bordeaux Blends are dry, red wines and generally have aromas and flavors of black currant, black cherry plum, graphite, cedar and violet. Cabernet-based, Left-Bank-styled wines are typically more tannic and structured, while Merlot-based wines, modeled after the Right Bank, are softer and suppler. Cabernet Franc can add herbal notes, while Malbec and Petit Verdot contribute color and structure.

Perfect Food Pairings for Bordeaux Blends

Since Bordeaux red blends are often quite structured and tannic, they pair best with hearty, flavorful and fatty meat dishes. Any type of steak makes for a classic pairing. Equally welcome with these wines would be beef brisket, pot roast, braised lamb or smoked duck.

Sommelier Secrets for Bordeaux Blends

While the region of Bordeaux is limited to a select few approved grape varieties in specified percentages, the New World is free to experiment. Bordeaux blends in California may include equal amounts of Cabernet Franc and Malbec, for example. Occassionally a winemaker might add a small percentage of a non-Bordeaux variety, such as Syrah or Petite Sirah for a desired result.

JOAF520374_2018 Item# 520374

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