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Chateau Angelus 2005

Bordeaux Red Blends from St. Emilion, Bordeaux, France
  • RP98
  • WS96
  • W&S96
  • CG95
0% ABV
  • JS100
  • WE99
  • RP98
  • JS100
  • WE98
  • RP97
  • WE97
  • JS96
  • D95
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3.7 2 Ratings
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3.7 2 Ratings
0% ABV

Winemaker Notes

This vintage also belongs on the list of great, legendary Bordeaux vintages. At Chateau Angelus, the vintage was crowned with outstanding scores by the great wine critics and acclaimed by all the professionals. Harmony, balance between power and freshness, and aromatic precision are the features of this unique vintage.

Critical Acclaim

All Vintages
RP 98
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
This 7,000 case blend of 60% Merlot and 40% Cabernet Franc will rival or perhaps eclipse vintages such as 2000, 1998, 1990, and 1989. Its dense purple color is followed by an extraordinary perfume of charcoal, espresso roast, blackberries, blueberries, and a hint of wood. In spite of its thick texture, terrific acidity, high tannins, and enormous intensity as well as richness, it is surprisingly approachable, but given how slowly the 1989 and 1990 have aged, I would recommend cellaring it for 8-10 years. It should keep for three decades. A brilliant wine!
WS 96
Wine Spectator
Black purple in color, with coffee, blackberry and currant on the nose. Full-bodied, with supervelvety tannins and a long aftertaste of toasty oak and ripe fruit. Very close to the 2000. Superb. Best after 2018. 7,000 cases made.
W&S 96
Wine & Spirits
Angélus has both beautiful richness and shape in 2005, the sensual touch people hope to find in merlot that it so rarely and exquisitely delivers. The spice, the beeswax, the chocolate and black fruit are all there, but the focus is on the wine's subtle power, not any particular flavor. This had appeared black and superripe en primeur. Now there's a dark, earthy vibration in the tannin, a reverberation in the middle that touches senses beyond taste. This should live for decades.
CG 95
Connoisseurs' Guide
Among the top St. Emilion bottlings in recent years, Angelus rings the bell once again with its rich and opulent style. Full, ripe and plush with more than a slight resemblance to Napa's best, it is a deeply fruited and unabashed proponent of the new "international" model. Its juicy intensity moves it to the head of the class now, but it has the tannic substructure to grow for a good many years.
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Chateau Angelus

Chateau Angelus

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Chateau Angelus, , France - Bordeaux
Chateau Angelus
Saint Emilion Premier Cru Classe. 60% Cabernet Franc, 40% Merlot. Average age of vines is 25 years. 150 acres producing 12,000 cases. Among the largest of the Grand Crus of Saint Emilion, Angelus was for many years rather underrated. However, since Hubert de Bouard took control in the early 1980s, everything about the estate has improved - most importantly, the wine. Today Angelus has a justifiably fine reputation.

With its fairytale aesthetic, Germanic influence, and strong emphasis on white wines, Alsace is one of France’s most unique viticultural regions. This hotly contested stretch of land on France’s northeastern border has spent much of its existence as German territory, and this is easy to see both in Alsace’s architecture and wine styles. A long, narrow strip running north to south, Alsace is nestled in the rain shadow of the Vosges mountains, making it perhaps the driest region of France. The growing season is long and cool, and autumn humidity facilitates the development of noble rot for the production of late-picked sweet wines Vendange Tardive and Sélection de Grains Nobles. Alsace is divided into two halves—the Haut-Rhin and the Bas-Rhin—the former, at higher elevations, is associated with higher quality and makes up the lower portion of the region.

The best wines of Alsace can be described as aromatic and honeyed, even when completely dry. The region’s “noble” varieties are Riesling, Gewurztraminer, Muscat, and Pinot Gris. Other varieties grown here include Pinot Blanc, Auxerrois, Chasselas, Sylvaner, and Pinot Noir—the only red grape permitted here, responsible for about 10% of production and often used for sparkling rosé known as Crémant d’Alsace. Riesling is Alsace’s main specialty, and historically has always been bone dry to differentiate it from its German counterparts. In its youth, Alsatian Riesling is fresh and floral, developing complex mineral and gunflint character with age. Gewurztraminer is known for its signature spice and lychee aromatics, and is often utilized for late harvest wines. Pinot Gris is prized for its combination of crisp acidity and savory spice as well as ripe stone fruit flavors. Muscat is vinified dry, and tastes of ripe green grapes and fresh rose petal. There are 51 Grand Cru vineyards in Alsace, and only these four noble varieties are permitted within. While most Alsatian wines are bottled varietally, blends of several (often lesser) varieties are commonly labeled as ‘Edelzwicker.’

Pinot Blanc

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Lightly aromatic, pleasantly soft, and always approachable, Pinot Blanc is best known in Alsace, where it is considered a workhorse variety that takes a backseat to the more complex Pinot Gris. A white mutation of Pinot Noir, it produces easy-drinking, enjoyable wines here. In Italy, as Pinot Bianco, it gets a little more complex, especially in the mountainous Alto Adige region. It is perhaps most successful as Weissburgunder in Germany and Austria, where the wines are subtle, delicate, surprisingly complex, and age-worthy. There is also some Pinot Blanc performing well in Oregon and cooler pockets of California.

In the Glass

Typically, Pinot Blanc has a relatively full body and expresses simple but pleasing aromas of crisp green apple, pear, citrus, and white flowers. The finest examples possess stony minerality and occasionally ripe stone fruit flavors, and with age can develop intriguing notes of honey, vanilla, and almond.

Perfect Pairings

Delicate Pinot Blanc works well with lighter fare such as salads, seafood, chicken, or turkey, but is truly at its best with Alsatian pairings like Hollandaise dishes, onion tarts, or the region’s notable soft cheeses such as Muenster.

Sommelier Secret

Pinot Blanc’s delicate aromatics, full body, and moderate acidity make it a great alternative to the world’s most popular white wine. Anyone experiencing Chardonnay fatigue and looking to try something new would benefit from giving Pinot Blanc a try.

DOB96144_2005 Item# 96144

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