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Caliterra Chardonnay 1998

Chardonnay from Chile
    0% ABV
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    Winemaker Notes

    Caliterra Chardonnay is a medium-bodied, elegant wine. Distinctive varietal characters are layered with vanilla and toffee notes. Between 20% and 50% of the blend is aged in oak, depending on the vintage. Partial malolactic fermentation contributes additional complexity. On the palate, fruit, oak and malolactic characters marry to create an enjoyable Chardonnay for any occasion. This wine features ripe apple, pear and tropical fruit aromas, with floral notes, vanilla and spice on the palate. Grilled prawns, turkey breast or crab and pasta salad are a few of our favorite pairings.

    Critical Acclaim

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    Caliterra

    Caliterra

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    Caliterra, Chile
    The Eduardo Chadwick family originally created Caliterra in 1989 as a sister project to the family-owned Viña Errazuriz of Chile. Caliterra developed its own distinct style, however, by sourcing fruit throughout Chile's prime wine-growing regions. Caliterra was named for la calidad de la tierra, because it reflects the "quality" (calidad) and the "finest land" (tierra) of Chile. From the beginning, Caliterra focused on discovering new vineyard sources, seeking the best quality for each variety.

    In 1996, the Chadwicks entered into a partnership with the Robert Mondavi family, which presented an ideal opportunity for us to realize our global vision of winemaking centered on an exchange of cultures and winemaking philosophies.

    "We saw the same potential in Chile that we saw in Napa Valley 30 years ago," said R. Michael Mondavi, President and CEO of Robert Mondavi. "But most importantly, with Caliterra we saw people who are dedicated to producing wines that belong in the company of the greatest wines in the world."

    Caliterra quickly evolved into a true working partnership. In the vineyards, viticulturists Pedro Izquierdo of Chile and Andy Bledsoe of California work together on all aspects of winegrowing, including planning new vineyard sites, managing existing vineyards and harvesting the grapes at their peak. They concentrate their efforts on finding the best vineyard sources for each variety.

    In 1998, Caliterra crushed its first vintage at La Arboleda, a new, state-of-the-art winery located in the Colchagua Valley. Colchagua, which is located within the Valle Central appellation, is quickly becoming one of Chile's premiere regions for red varieties. Looking ahead, Caliterra will continue to explore the potential of Chilean wines as newer vineyards develop. The partners also plan to build a visitors center.

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    One of South America’s most important wine-producing countries, Chile is a reliable source of both budget-friendly wines and premium bottlings. Spanish settlers, Juan Jufre and Diego Garcia de Cáceres, most likely brought Vitis vinifera (Europe’s wine producing vine species) to the Central Valley of Chile some time in the 1550s. But Chile’s modern wine industry is largely the result of heavy investment from the 1990s.

    Long and narrow, Chile is geographically isolated, bordered by the Pacific Ocean to the west, the Andes Mountains to the east and the Atacama desert to the north. These natural borders allowed Chile to avoid the disastrous phylloxera infestation in the late 1800s and as a result, vines are often planted on their own rootstock rather than grafted (as is the case in much of the wine producing world).

    Chile’s vineyards vary widely in climate and soil type from north to south. The Coquimbo region in the far north contains the Elqui and Limari Valleys, where minimal rainfall and intense sunlight are offset by chilly breezes from the Humboldt Current. While historically focused solely on Pisco production, today this area finds success with Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. The Aconcagua region contains the eponymous Aconcagua Valley—hot and dry and home to full-bodied red wines made from Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah and Merlot—as well as Casablanca Valley and San Antonio Valley, which focus on Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc. The Central Valley is home to the Maipo, Rapel, Curicó and Maule Valleys, which produce a wide variety of red and white wines. Maipo in particular is known for Carmenère, Chile’s unofficial signature grape. In the up-and-coming southern regions of Bio Bio and Itata make excellent Riesling, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir.

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    Chardonnay

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    One of the most popular and versatile white wine grapes, Chardonnay offers a wide range of flavors and styles depending on where it is grown and how it is made. While practically every country in the wine producing world grows it, Chardonnay from its Burgundian homeland produces some of the most remarkable and longest lived examples. As far as cellar potential, white Burgundy rivals the world’s other age-worthy whites like Riesling or botrytized Semillon. California is Chardonnay’s second most important home, where both oaky, buttery styles and leaner, European-inspired wines enjoy great popularity. Oregon, Australia and South America are also significant producers of Chardonnay.

    In the Glass

    When planted on cool sites, Chardonnay flavors tend towards grapefruit, lemon zest, green apple, celery leaf and wet flint, while warmer locations coax out richer, more tropical flavors of melon, peach and pineapple. Oak can add notes of vanilla, coconut and spice, while malolactic fermentation imparts a soft and creamy texture.

    Perfect Pairings

    Chardonnay is as versatile at the table as it is in the vineyard. The crisp, clean, Chablis-like styles go well with flaky white fish with herbs, scallops, turkey breast and soft cheeses. Richer Chardonnays marry well with lobster, crab, salmon, roasted chicken and creamy sauces.

    Sommelier Secret

    Since the 1990s, big, oaky, buttery Chardonnays from California have enjoyed explosive popularity. More recently, the pendulum has begun to swing in the opposite direction, towards a clean, crisp style that rarely utilizes new oak. In Burgundy, the subregion of Chablis, while typically employing the use of older oak barrels, produces a similar bright and acid-driven style. Anyone who doesn't like oaky Chardonnay would likely enjoy its lighter style.

    SOU6085_1998 Item# 13212