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Flat front label of wine

Bruno Clair Marsannay Rose 1999

Rosé from Burgundy, France
    0% ABV
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    Bruno Clair

    Bruno Clair

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    Bruno Clair, Burgundy, France
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    Domaine Bruno Clair’s origins are Domaine Clair-Daü, one of the most celebrated domaines in Burgundy from the 1950s to the early 1970s.The domaine is 23 hectares of, well, everything: grand crus, values, rosé, geeky village level, geeky premier crus, and for a predominantly red wine estate, even some Corton-Charlemagne. There is some brilliant genetic material here too as it was from Bruno’s father (as well as from Ponsot) that the Dijon University got many of the cutting that are at the origin of today’s clones. The wines are about delicately extracted fruit on the front palate, backed by serious structure on the mid-palate. If there is one domaine in the Côte de Nuits poised to become (or re-become) a planetary rock star, given the holdings and the talent here, it is this one.

    Burgundy

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    A legendary wine region setting the benchmark for Pinot Noir and Chardonnay worldwide, Burgundy is a perennial favorite of many wine lovers. After centuries of winemaking, the Burgundians have determined precisely which grape clone grows best on which plot of land, determined by the soil type, the elevation, and the angle in relation to the sun—this is a region firmly rooted in tradition and the concept of ‘terroir’ reigns supreme here. Because of the Napoleonic Code requiring equal distribution of property and land among all heirs, vineyard ownership in Burgundy is extremely fragmented, with some growers responsible for just one row or even one vine. This system has led to the predominance of the "negociant"—a merchant who purchases fruit from many different growers to vinify and bottle together.

    Burgundy’s cool, marginal climate and Jurassic limestone soils are perfect for the production of elegant, savory, and mineral-driven Chardonnay and Pinot Noir with plenty of acidity. Vintage variation is of particular importance here, as weather conditions can be variable and unpredictable. Spring frost and hail are near-universal risks. The Côte d’Or, a long and narrow escarpment, forms the heart of the region, split into the Côte de Nuits to the north and the Côte de Beaune to the south. The former is home to many of the world’s finest Pinot Noir wines, while Chardonnay plays a much more prominent role in the latter, though outstanding red, white, and rosé are all produced throughout. Other key appellations include the Côte Chalonnaise, home to great value Pinot Noir and sparkling Crémant de Bourgogne; the Mâconnais, producing soft and round inexpensive Chardonnay; and Chablis, the northernmost region of Burgundy and an acidity-lover’s Chardonnay paradise.

    Rosé Wine

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    Whether it’s playful and fun or savory and serious, most rosé today is not your grandmother’s White Zinfandel, though that category remains strong. Pink wine has recently become quite trendy, and this time around it’s commonly quite dry. It is produced throughout the world from a vast array of grape varieties, but the most successful sources are California, southern France (particularly Provence), and parts of Spain and Italy.

    Since the pigment in red wines comes from keeping fermenting juice in contact with the grape skins for an extended period, it follows that a pink wine can be made using just a brief period of skin contact—usually just a couple of days. The resulting color will depend on the grape variety and the winemaking style, ranging from pale salmon to deep magenta. These wines are typically fresh and fruity, fermented at cool temperatures in stainless steel to preserve the primary aromas and flavors. Most rosé, with a few notable exceptions, should be drunk rather young, within a few years of the vintage.

    CVI341420_1999 Item# 28320