Processing Your Order...

Search for ""

Update your browser to enjoy all that Wine.com has to offer.

It's easy to update and using the latest version
of Internet Explorer means all your web browsing will be better.

Yes, Update Now

Brancott Reserve Sauvignon Blanc 2002

Sauvignon Blanc from New Zealand
  • WS90
0% ABV
  • W&S90
  • WS92
  • WE88
  • WE90
  • WE90
  • WS91
  • WS90
All Vintages
Currently Unavailable $21.99
Try the
21 99
21 99
Save $0.00 (0%)
Ships Wed, Feb 27
Limit 0 bottles per customer
Sold in increments of 0
Add to Cart
0
Limit Reached
0.0 0 Ratings
My Wine Share
Vintage Alert
Alert me when new vintages are available
Rate for better recommendations
(256 characters remaining)
Cancel Save

0.0 0 Ratings
0% ABV

Winemaker Notes

"Tangy and lively, with green melon, fig and citrus flavors that echo beautifully on the vibrant finish. Drink now."
-Wine Spectator

The 2002 Brancott Reserve balances fresh fruit flavors and the refreshingly crisp acidity that are the hallmark of exceptional Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc. Aromas of fresh green bell pepper and ripe nectarine dominate the nose. The long, rich palate displays sweet bell pepper, melon and stone fruit, which are nicely complemented by touches of ripe tropical fruit.

The grapes for Brancott Vineyards Reserve Sauvignon Blanc are harvested predominantly from the Brancott Estate vineyard on the southeastern side of the Wairau Valley of Marlborough. The Wairau Valley is protected by mountain ranges to the north and west, and by the Kaikoura Mountains to the south. Brancott Estate is in a small side valley facing north which receives maximum sunshine. The soils of the vineyard are derived from glacial outwash material and can generally be described as silt loam overlying gravels and rocks. These soils are low in fertility and have a low water holding capacity. Viticultural practices applied in the vineyard assist in flavor development and include techniques such as specialized trellising, trimming of the vines and removal of leaves in the fruit zone to allow sunlight exposure.

Critical Acclaim

All Vintages
WS 90
Wine Spectator
View More
Brancott

Brancott

View all wine
Brancott, New Zealand
Image of winery

The Brancott Winery opened in 1977, making it one of the oldest wineries in Marlborough. From producing one of the world's first grape tipping tanks, the winery has stayed true to its pioneering herigate and embraced innovation. It was one of the first to commercially plant Sauvignon Blanc in Marlborough in 1973, at the top of New Zealand's South Island and has been heavily instrumental in developing the region as one of the foremost viticultural regions for Sauvignon Blanc world-wide. At present, Brancott Estate continues to lead with its innovative winemaking approach and passionate commitment to excellence under the stewardship of chief winemaker, Patrick Materman.

New Zealand

View all wine

A relatively young but extremely promising wine producing country, New Zealand is widely recognized for its distinctive wines made from the aromatic, Sauvignon blanc.

The world’s most southerly vineyards are found here, with significant climatic variation both between and within the warmer North Island and the cooler South Island. Overall, the climate is maritime, with plenty of rainfall, as well as abundant sunshine. Producers have almost unilaterally embraced cutting-edge winery technology, resulting in clean, high-quality wines at every price point from wallet-friendly to premium.

Sauvignon blanc, known here for its trademark herbaceous character, is at its best in Marlborough but thrives throughout the nation, accounting for an overwhelming majority of the country’s exports. While this is indeed the country’s most planted and successful variety, it is certainly not the only New Zealand grape capable of delighting wine lovers.

Chardonnay is the second-most important white variety and takes on a supple texture with citrus and tropical fruit aromas in Gisborne and Hawke’s Bay, respectively. Pinot noir, second behind Sauvignon blanc in national production numbers, is at its best in Central Otago—the most southerly winegrowing region in the world! These wines are known for bright and juicy red fruit. Taking cues from the wines of Alsace, aromatic varieties like Pinot Gris, Riesling and Gewürztraminer shine in Martinborough, while red Bordeaux varieties like Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot have found success in Hawke’s Bay. Throughout New Zealand but especially in Marlborough, Pinot noir and Chardonnay are used to produce traditional method sparkling wines.

Sauvignon Blanc

View all wine

A crisp, refreshing variety that equally reflects both terroir and varietal character, Sauvignon blanc is responsible for a vast array of wine styles. However, a couple of commonalities always exist—namely, zesty acidity and intense aromatics. The variety is of French provenance, and is most important in Bordeaux and the Loire Valley. It also shines in New Zealand, California, Australia and parts of northeastern Italy. Chile and South Africa are excellent sources of high-quality, value-priced Sauvignon blanc.

In the Glass

From its homeland In Bordeaux, winemakers prefer to blend it with Sémillon to produce a softer, richer style. In the Loire Valley, it expresses citrus, flint and smoky flavors, especially from in Sancerre and Pouilly-Fumé. Marlborough, New Zealand often produces a pungent and racy version, reminiscent of cut grass, gooseberry and grapefruit. California's style is fruit-driven, in either a soft and oak-aged or snappy and fresh version.

Perfect Pairings

The freshness of Sauvignon blanc’s flavor lends it to a range of light, summery dishes including salad, seafood and mild Asian cuisine. Sauvignon Blanc settles in comfortably at the table with notoriously difficult foods like artichokes or asparagus. When combined with Sémillon (and perhaps some oak), it matches well with complex seafood and chicken dishes.

Sommelier Secret

Along with Cabernet Franc, Sauvignon blanc is a proud parent of Cabernet Sauvignon. That green bell pepper aroma that all three varieties share is no coincidence—it comes from a high concentration of pyrazines (herbaceous aromatic compounds) inherent to each member of the family.

RWC290633_2002 Item# 53340