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Batasiolo Dolcetto d'Alba 2015

Dolcetto from Alba, Piedmont, Italy
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    Winemaker Notes

    The color is ruby red with hints of purple, clear and transparent. The nose has great fruitiness with strong evidence of red fruits, cherries and flowers, especially violets. The palate is rich, full, fresh and perfectly balanced with a slight bitter aftertaste. Great personality, offering the full range of feelings of young wines.

    Critical Acclaim

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    Batasiolo

    Batasiolo

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    Batasiolo, Alba, Piedmont, Italy
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    In the local dialect of old rural Piedmont the word "beni", meaning "property, assets", has always been used with a slightly different meaning, denoting not only the farming land belonging to large landowners, but also small-holdings: "andè' nti beni" means going out into the fields or the vineyards to work or to give instruction. Nourishment comes from the land - the asset par excellence - and the soul of the farmer, who identifies himself with his property, is inextricably tied to the land.

    The "Beni di Batasiolo", the amphitheatre of vineyards surrounding Batasiolo's cellars, was the original setting for their company. Over the years other farms - other "properties" - have been added to this nucleus, and now the estate covers nearly one hundred hectares of vineyards, making it one of the largest farming concerns in the Langhe.

    Beloved for flavorful red wines, Alba is an epicurean’s dream. The historic walled town at its heart is where growers from throughout the Piedmont region would once go to sell their produce to winemakers and négociants following the harvest, but today it is better recognized as one of Italy’s premiere culinary destinations. Sandwiched between Barolo and Barbaresco, the best vineyards, located atop sunny, south-facing hills, are planted with Nebbiolo. A popular entry-level alternative to its pricier neighbors, Nebbiolo d’Alba is softer and less tannic, ready to drink within just a couple years of bottling.

    Dolcetto, one of Piedmont’s more easygoing varieties, is commonly grown here, known as Dolecetto d'Alba, and can often be found casually served in carafes on the tables of Alba’s oseterias and trattorias. These light and smooth wines are meant to be drunk young and with gusto while the region’s more serious wines age. Barbera is planted here as well, and takes on a more powerful, structured personality than that of its counterparts in Asti.

    Dolcetto

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    An easy-drinker with modest acidity, soft fruity flavors—but catchy tannins, Dolcetto is often enjoyed in its native Piedmont while more serious Barolos and Barbarescos take their time to age. Here, this is the wine you are most likely to find at the table on a casual Tuesday night, accompanying local charcuterie or "apertivo" hour (the canonical Piemontese way to tease your palate before dinner). In recent years Dolcetto has found some footing in California, but plantings are fairly limited outside of Italy.

    In the Glass

    Dolcetto translates to “little sweet one,” and though the wines produced are typically not sweet in terms of residual sugar, they do possess delightfully fruity flavors of red cherry and blueberry, with an almond-like bitterness at the end and occasional hints of chocolate and baking spice.

    Perfect Pairings

    Dolcetto is a lively, exuberant variety without a ton of complexity in most cases, and as such is best paired with simple, flavorsome foods such as pasta, pizza and simple meats—anything an Italian farmer might consume after a long day in the field.

    Sommelier Secret

    In most of Piedmont, easy-ripening Dolcetto is relegated to the secondary sites—the best of which are reserved for the king variety: Nebbiolo. However, in the Dogliani zone it is the star of the show, and here it makes a bigger, riper and a more serious style of Dolcetto, many of which can improve with cellar time.

    PIN416027_2015 Item# 175630