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Batasiolo Barbera d'Alba Sovrana 2013

Barbera from Alba, Piedmont, Italy
  • JS91
0% ABV
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  • WS88
  • WS88
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Winemaker Notes

Intense ruby red with garnet reflections. Delicate, with a ripe fruit scent which harmonizes well with the aromatic notes from the wood. Warm, full and harmonious, delivering the typical freshness of Barbera.

Ideal for accompanying white or red meats, meat with sauces and medium to mature cheeses.

Critical Acclaim

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JS 91
James Suckling
A juicy red with dried berry and lemon rind character. Medium body, delicious velvety tannins. Drink now.
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Batasiolo

Batasiolo

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Batasiolo, Italy
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In the local dialect of old rural Piedmont the word "beni", meaning "property, assets", has always been used with a slightly different meaning, denoting not only the farming land belonging to large landowners, but also small-holdings: "andè' nti beni" means going out into the fields or the vineyards to work or to give instruction. Nourishment comes from the land - the asset par excellence - and the soul of the farmer, who identifies himself with his property, is inextricably tied to the land.

The "Beni di Batasiolo", the amphitheatre of vineyards surrounding Batasiolo's cellars, was the original setting for their company. Over the years other farms - other "properties" - have been added to this nucleus, and now the estate covers nearly one hundred hectares of vineyards, making it one of the largest farming concerns in the Langhe.

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An historic village situated right in between the famous regions of Barolo and Barbaresco, Alba is also the name for the larger wine region surrounding the village.

In a sense, “Alba” is a catch-all phrase, and includes the declassified Nebbiolo wines made in Barolo and Barbaresco, as well as the Nebbiolo grown just outside of these regions’ borders. In fact, Nebbiolo d’Alba is a softer, less tannic and more fruit-forward wine ready to drink within just a couple years of bottling. It is a great place to start if you want to begin to understand the grape. Likewise, the even broader category of Langhe Nebbiolo offers approachable and value-driven options as well.

Barbera, planted alongside Nebbiolo in the surrounding hills, and referred to as Barbera d’Alba, takes on a more powerful and concentrated personality compared to its counterparts in Asti.

Dolcetto is ubiquitous here and, known as Dolcetto d'Alba, can be found casually served alongside antipasti on the tables of Alba’s cafes and wine bars.

Not surprisingly, given its location, Alba is recognized as one of Italy’s premiere culinary destinations and is the home of the fall truffle fair, which attracts visitors from worldwide every year.

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Friendly, approachable and full of juicy red fruit, Barbera produces wines in a wide range of styles, from youthful, fresh and fruity to serious, structured and age-worthy. Piedmont is the most famous source of Barbera, but it is also planted in a few nearby Italian provinces and remains one of the most widely planted varieties in the country. Barbera actually can adapt to many climates and enjoys success in California—particularly in the Sierra Foothills—and some southern hemisphere wine regions.

In the Glass

Barbera is typically marked by flavors of red cherry, raspberry or blackberry and backed by a signature zingy acidity. Warmer sites produce Barberas with intensely ripe fruit and complex notes of cocoa, savory spice, anise and nutmeg. Cooler sites will produce a lighter Barbera with more finesse and intriguing notes of cranberry, graphite, smoke, lavender and violet.

Perfect Pairings

Barbera’s prominent acidity makes it a natural match with tomato-based dishes, making it an easy pairing with a wide array of Italian cuisine. It works just as well with lighter red meat dishes, hamburgers or barbecue.

Sommelier Secret

In the past it wasn’t common or even accepted to age Barbera in oak but today both styles—oaked and unoaked—abound, at least in Piedmont. In fact, many Piemontese producers today still make a deliciously pure, fruity and unoaked version, intended for earlier consumption. The wine world didn't realize Barbera's potential until the work of Giacomo Bologna in Asti in the 1960s. His debut of the barrique-aged Barbera called Bricco dell’Uccellone revealed this grape's true potential. Many of the better bottlings of Piemontese Barbera can age gracefully for 10-15 years or more.

PBC9018035_2013 Item# 151333