Processing Your Order...

Search for ""

Update your browser to enjoy all that Wine.com has to offer.

It's easy to update and using the latest version
of Internet Explorer means all your web browsing will be better.

Yes, Update Now
Flat front label of wine
Flat front label of wineFront shot of wine bottle

Barkan Classic Pinot Noir 2016

Pinot Noir from Israel
    12.5% ABV
    All Vintages
    Currently Unavailable $11.99
    Try the
    13
    11 99
    Save $1.01 (8%)
    Ships today if ordered in next 30 minutes
    Limit 0 bottles per customer
    Sold in increments of 0
    Add to Cart
    1
    Limit Reached
    0.0 0 Ratings
    My Wine Share
    Vintage Alert
    Alert me when new vintages are available
    Rate for better recommendations
    (256 characters remaining)
    Cancel Save

    0.0 0 Ratings
    12.5% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    Barkan Classic Pinot Noir offers strawberry aromas with hints of black cherries and mint. This is a wine that will pair well with grilled salmon, braised chicken dishes, or veal.

    Critical Acclaim

    All Vintages
    Barkan

    Barkan

    View all wine
    Barkan, Israel
    Barkan was founded as Friedman Winery by Shlomo Friedman in 1899, to produce sweet Kiddush wine and brandy for the Jewish settlement in Israel. In 1990, ownership of the winery passed into the hands of Yair Lerner and Shmuel Boxer, who were the winery’s largest grape growers at that point. They immediately set forth on a program of modernization and planting of vineyards.

    They determined that Kibbutz Hulda would be a good site for the new center. The proximity to one of Barkan’s main vineyards – Hulda – was the most imprtant consideration, and its central location, close to major roads and removed from urban areas, was also important. Barkan receives grapes from vineyards from all the best regions in Israel. The winery’s location allows the grapes to be quickly transported to the winery, to insure freshness and to maximize quality. In addition, the strategic location was optimal for distribution of the bottled wine to market.

    With a rich history of wine production dating back to biblical times, Israel is a part of the cradle of wine civilization. Here, wine was commonly used for religious ceremonies as well as for general consumption. During Roman times, it was a popular export, but during Islamic rule around 1300, production was virtually extinguished. The modern era of Israeli winemaking began in the late 19th century with help from Bordeaux’s Rothschild family. Accordingly, most grapes grown in Israel today are made from native French varieties. Indigenous varieties are all but extinct, though oenologists have made recent attempts to rediscover ancient varieties such as Marawi for commercial wine production.

    In Israel’s Mediterranean climate, humidity and drought can be problematic, concentrating much of the country’s grape growing in the north near Galilee, Samaria near the coast and at higher elevations in the east. The most successful red varieties are Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Syrah, while the best whites are made from Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc. Many, though by no means all, Israeli wines are certified Kosher.

    Pinot Noir

    View all wine

    One of the most finicky yet rewarding grapes to grow, Pinot Noir is a labor of love for many. However, the greatest red wines of Burgundy prove that it is unquestionably worth the effort. In fact, it is the only red variety permitted in Burgundy. Highly reflective of its terroir, Pinot Noir prefers calcareous soils and a cool climate, requires low yields to achieve high quality and demands a lot of attention in the vineyard and winery. It retains even more glory as an important component of Champagne as well as on its own in France’s Loire Valley and Alsace regions. This sensational grape enjoys immense international success, most notably growing in Oregon, California and New Zealand with smaller amounts in Chile, Germany (as Spätburgunder) and Italy (as Pinot Nero).

    In the Glass

    Pinot Noir is all about red fruit—strawberry, raspberry and cherry with some heftier styles delving into the red or purple plum and in the other direction, red or orange citrus. It is relatively pale in color with soft tannins and a lively acidity. With age (of which the best examples can handle an astounding amount) it can develop hauntingly alluring characteristics of fresh earth, savory spice, dried fruit and truffles.

    Perfect Pairings

    Pinot’s healthy acidity cuts through the oiliness of pink-fleshed fish like salmon and tuna but its mild mannered tannins give it enough structure to pair with all sorts of poultry: chicken, quail and especially duck. As the namesake wine of Boeuf Bourguignon, Pinot noir has proven it isn’t afraid of beef. California examples work splendidly well with barbecue and Pinot Noir is also vegetarian-friendly—most notably with any dish that features mushrooms.

    Sommelier Secret

    For administrative purposes, the region of Beaujolais is often included in Burgundy. But it is extremely different in terms of topography, soil and climate, and the important red grape here is ultimately Gamay. Truth be told, there is a tiny amount of Gamay sprinkled around the outlying parts of Burgundy (mainly in Maconnais) but it isn’t allowed with any great significance and certainly not in any Villages or Cru level wines.

    SWS116057_2016 Item# 365230