Badenhorst Secateurs Rose 2018 Front Label
Badenhorst Secateurs Rose 2018 Front LabelBadenhorst Secateurs Rose 2018  Front Bottle Shot

Badenhorst Secateurs Rose 2018

    750ML / 0% ABV
    Other Vintages
    • RP89
    • RP90
    All Vintages
    Currently Unavailable $19.99
    Try the
    19 99
    19 99
    Save $0.00 (0%)
    Ships Sat, Dec 12
    Limit 0 bottles per customer
    Sold in increments of 0
    0
    Limit Reached
    0.0 0 Ratings
    MyWine Share
    Vintage Alert
    Alert me when new vintages are available
    Have you tried this? Rate it now
    (256 characters remaining)

    0.0 0 Ratings
    750ML / 0% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    Secateurs – shape Badenhorst's bush vines during the winter pruning and are used to pick the ripe grapes in summer. The winery's family has, for the last three generations, nurtured their vines so that they can produce fruit of integrity. This is a truly unique rose as it was made from very old vines and really displays the minerality that characterizes the wines from Badenhorst's farm. The aromas are complex red fruits, spice, rose water, currants and the palate is generous and textured with a long finish.

    Critical Acclaim

    All Vintages
    Badenhorst

    Badenhorst

    View all products
    Badenhorst, South Africa
    Badenhorst Winery Video
    AA Badenhorst Family Wines are grown, made and matured on Kalmoesfontein farm in the Swartland appellation of South Africa. The 28 hectares of old bushvines grow in the Siebritskloof part of the Paardeberg mountain.

    The property is owned by the dynamic and good-looking cousins Hein and Adi Badenhorst. They are originally from Constantia. Their grandfather was the farm manager of Groot Constantia for 46 years. Their fathers were born there and farmed together in Constantia, during the days when people still ate fresh vegetables and Hanepoot grapes, drank Cinsault and there were a lot less traffic lights and hippies still had a presence. Together these two have restored a neglected cellar on the farm that was last used in the 1930s to make natural wines in the traditional manner.

    Image for South African Wine content section
    View all products

    With an important wine renaissance in full swing, impressive red and white bargains abound in South Africa. The country has a particularly long and rich history with winemaking, especially considering its status as part of the “New World.” In the mid-17th century, the lusciously sweet dessert wines of Constantia were highly prized by the European aristocracy. Since then, the South African wine industry has experienced some setbacks due to the phylloxera infestation of the late 1800s and political difficulties throughout the following century.

    Today, however, South Africa is increasingly responsible for high-demand, high-quality wines—a blessing to put the country back on the international wine map. Wine production is mainly situated around Cape Town, where the climate is generally warm to hot. But the Benguela Current from Antarctica provides brisk ocean breezes necessary for steady ripening of grapes. Similarly, cooler, high-elevation vineyard sites throughout South Africa offer similar, favorable growing conditions.

    South Africa’s wine zones are divided into region, then smaller districts and finally wards, but the country’s wine styles are differentiated more by grape variety than by region. Pinotage, a cross between Pinot Noir and Cinsault, is the country’s “signature” grape, responsible for red-fruit-driven, spicy, earthy reds. When Pinotage is blended with other red varieties, like Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Syrah or Pinot Noir (all commonly vinified alone as well), it is often labeled as a “Cape Blend.” Chenin Blanc (locally known as “Steen”) dominates white wine production, with Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc following close behind.

    Image for Rosé Wine content section
    View all products

    Whether it’s playful and fun or savory and serious, most rosé today is not your grandmother’s White Zinfandel, though that category remains strong. Pink wine has recently become quite trendy, and this time around it’s commonly quite dry. Since the pigment in red wines comes from keeping fermenting juice in contact with the grape skins for an extended period, it follows that a pink wine can be made using just a brief period of skin contact—usually just a couple of days. The resulting color depends on grape variety and winemaking style, ranging from pale salmon to deep magenta.

    EPC37895_2018 Item# 493876

    Internet Explorer is no longer supported.
    Please use a different browser like Edge, Chrome or Firefox to enjoy all that Wine.com has to offer.

    It's easy to make the switch.
    Enjoy better browsing and increased security.

    Yes, Update Now
    Cheers to You!

    FREE SHIPPING on $59*. Code MERRY

    FREE SHIPPING on $59*. Code MERRY

    There was an error redeeming your code.

    *Order must be placed by 12/6/2020. Applies to standard shipping only. Order must be at least $59 excluding shipping and tax. Expedited shipping options may require an additional charge. Not applicable to Hawaii and Alaska orders. A standard shipping charge will appear at checkout but the promo code will credit an amount back so that you pay 1 cent for shipping. Promotion does not apply to corporate orders. Not valid on Bordeaux Futures. Offer valid subject to state law limitations.

    Search for ""

    Processing Your Order...