Argyle Brut Rose 2011 Front Label
Argyle Brut Rose 2011 Front LabelArgyle Brut Rose 2011 Front Bottle ShotArgyle Brut Rose 2011 Back Bottle Shot

Argyle Brut Rose 2011

  • W&S91
  • WE91
750ML / 12.5% ABV
Other Vintages
  • WW92
  • W&S91
  • WW92
  • WS91
  • WE92
  • WS91
  • RP91
  • RP93
  • WS90
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750ML / 12.5% ABV

Winemaker Notes

This year's blend is 25% Pinot Meunier, 70% Pinot Noir, and 5% Chardonnay. Its color is bright, pale salmon pink, while its bouquet is full of rose petal, anise, and pink peppercorn. The barrel aging of the red wine component contributes to its savory complexity, while its delicate, creamy bead leads to a long textural finish only enhanced by food... salt-cod fritters and smoked piquillo aioli.

Certified sustainable (LIVE & Salmon-Safe)

Critical Acclaim

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W&S 91
Wine & Spirits
A blend of pinot noir and pinot meunier (70/25) with a dollop of chardonnay, this attractive sparkler has the color of an orange rose. It has a citrusy scent overlayingwhite cherry flavors, with a sour lees accent that gives the wine freshness and tension.
WE 91
Wine Enthusiast
Principally Pinot Noir, the blend includes 25% Pinot Meunier and a splash of Chardonnay. It's a light and pretty salmon pink in hue, with hints of honeysuckle and moist earth in the nose. Flavors suggest tart raspberries and Bing cherries, with impressive minerality in the crisp, lingering finish.
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Argyle

Argyle

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Argyle, Oregon
Argyle Lone Star Vineyard Winery Image

Twenty-five years ago, Argyle began making wine in Oregon's Willamette Valley. Since 1987, winemaker Rollin Soles and viticulturist Allen Holstein have teamed up to produce world-class method champenoise sparkling wines, barrel-fermented Chardonnay, and silky-textured Pinor Noir from low-yielding vines that are winery farmed on some of the best hillside slopes and elevations. Argyle wines have received a total of 11 Wine Spectator Top 100 designations - more than any other winery in Oregon. The Argyle wines represented on this list include sparkling wine, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, truly making Argyle one of the finest practitioners of the craft of elegant, long-lived winegrowing.

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One of Pinot Noir’s most successful New World outposts, the Willamette Valley is the largest and most important AVA in Oregon. With a continental climate moderated by the influence of the Pacific Ocean, it is perfect for cool-climate viticulture and the production of elegant wines.

Mountain ranges bordering three sides of the valley, particularly the Chehalem Mountains, provide the option for higher-elevation vineyard sites.

The valley's three prominent soil types (volcanic, sedimentary and silty, loess) make it unique and create significant differences in wine styles among its vineyards and sub-AVAs. The iron-rich, basalt-based, Jory volcanic soils found commonly in the Dundee Hills are rich in clay and hold water well; the chalky, sedimentary soils of Ribbon Ridge, Yamhill-Carlton and McMinnville encourage complex root systems as vines struggle to search for water and minerals. In the most southern stretch of the Willamette, the Eola-Amity Hills sub-AVA soils are mixed, shallow and well-drained. The Hills' close proximity to the Van Duzer Corridor (which became its own appellation as of 2019) also creates grapes with great concentration and firm acidity, leading to wines that perfectly express both power and grace.

Though Pinot noir enjoys the limelight here, Pinot gris, Pinot blanc and Chardonnay also thrive in the Willamette. Increasing curiosity has risen recently in the potential of others like Grüner Veltliner, Chenin blanc and Gamay.

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What are the different types of Champagne and sparkling wine?

Beloved for its lively bubbles, sparkling wine is the ultimate beverage for any festivity, whether it's a major celebration or a mere merrymaking of nothing much! Sparkling wine is made throughout the winemaking world, but only can be called “Champagne” if it comes from the Champagne region of France and is made using what is referred to as the "traditional method." Other regions have their own specialties—Crémant in other parts of France, Cava in Spain and Prosecco in Italy, to name a few. New World regions like California, Australia and New Zealand enjoy the freedom to make many styles, with production methods and traditions defined locally. In a dry style, Champagne and sparkling wine goes with just about any type of food. Sweet styles are not uncommon and among both dry and sweet, you'll find white, rosé—or even red!—examples.

How is Champagne and sparkling wine made?

Champagne, Crémant, Cava and many other sparkling wines of the world are made using the traditional method, in which the second fermentation (the one that makes the bubbles) takes place inside the bottle. With this method, spent yeast cells remain in contact with the wine during bottle aging, giving it a creamy mouthful, toasted bread or brioche qualities and in many cases, the capacity to age. For Prosecco, the carbonation process usually occurs in a stainless steel tank (before bottling) to preserve the fresh fruity and floral aromas imminent in this style.

What gives Champagne and sparkling wine its bubbles?

The bubbles in sparkling wine are formed when the base wine undergoes a secondary fermentation, which traps carbon dioxide inside the bottle or fermentation vessel.

How do you serve Champagne and sparkling wine?

Ideally for storing Champagne and sparkling wine in any long-term sense, it should be at cellar temperature, about 55F. For serving, cool Champagne and sparkling wine down to about 40F to 50F. (Most refrigerators are colder than this.) As for drinking Champagne and sparkling wine, the best glasses have a stem and flute or tulip shape to allow the bead (bubbles) to show.

How long does Champagne and sparkling wine last?

Most sparkling wines like Prosecco, Cava or others around the “$20 and under” price point are intended for early consumption. Wines made using the traditional method with extended cellar time before release can typically improve with age. If you are unsure, definitely consult a wine professional for guidance.

PIN378975_2011 Item# 140655

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