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Allegrini Valpolicella 2005

Other Red Wine from Veneto, Italy
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Winemaker Notes

Made from 60% Corvina Veronese, 35% Rondinella and 5% Molinara vinified in stainless steel tanks. This wine is characterized by fresh, cherry-like perfumes, moderate alcohol levels and balanced acidity. The wine's fruity perfume is maximized by using a short maceration period during the winemaking process. It is lively and easy to drink with moderate tannins and a bright, vivacious color. Enjoy this wine while it is still young and exhibits its most fragrant and intense fruit.

Critical Acclaim

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Allegrini

Allegrini

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Allegrini, , Italy
Allegrini
The estate is based in Fumane di Valpolicella, just north of Verona in northeastern Italy. Valpolicella, or "valley of many cellars" is an area crossed from north to south by a series of hills, which in succession form three parallel valleys. These valleys are crossed by steep-sided, narrow river beds which remain dry except during spring thaws or autumn rains.

The Allegrini family has been handing down grape growing and wine producing traditions over many generations, playing a major role in the Valpolicella Classico area for many centuries. Giovanni Allegrini was the founder of the new generation. He was extremely proud to be part of the Valpolicella, and dedicated his many resources and energies to this land. He was among the first in questioning local viticultural techniques, revolutionizing accepted practices, and speaking clearly about quality. He was able to combine the science of enology with strict grape selection, and between 1960 and 1970, made some of the Valpolicella's best wines.

Allegrini's winemaking philosophy is largely based on the concept of "cru" production: a single vineyard dedicated to the production of local varieties destined to become a single wine. These crus have been a success worldwide: The Palazzo della Torre, La Grola and La Poja have set the highest benchmarks for Valpolicella's wines.

Home to the world’s most powerful wines made from the Nebbiolo grape, the Barolo village of Piedmont has long been known as “the wine of kings, the king of wines.” There are two predominant soil types here, which distinguish Barolo from neighboring Barbaresco as well as from the lesser surrounding areas. Compact and fertile Tortonian sandy marls define the vineyards to the west, typically resulting in fresher, fruitier, and softer wines that are approachable relatively early on in their evolution. This is sometimes referred to as the “feminine” side of Barolo and is closer in style to Barbaresco with its elegant perfume. On the eastern side of the region, Helvetian sandstone clay soils are chalkier and less fertile, producing age-worthy wines with full body and structured tannins—the more “masculine” style. The best Barolo wines need 10-15 years before they are ready to drink, and can further age for several decades.

Barolo is one of the world’s most distinctive red wines, and experienced tasters typically have no trouble picking it out of a lineup. In addition to Nebbiolo’s signature “tar and roses” aroma, one can expect to find complex notes of strawberries, cherries, leather, white truffles, anise, fresh and dried herbs, tobacco, violets, plum, and much more. Despite its deceptively light garnet color, Barolo has a full presence on the palate and plenty of tannin and acidity. The traditional style of Barolo relies on the use of neutral large wooden vats for aging, which do not impart flavor to the wine and preserve the natural character of the Nebbiolo grape. Meanwhile, a more modern, “international” style of Barolo utilizes small French oak barrels to add spicy, woody flavors and a softer texture resulting in earlier drinkability.

Nebbiolo

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Responsible for some of the most elegant and age-worthy wines in the world, Nebbiolo is the star variety of northern Italy’s Piedmont region. Grown throughout the area as well as in neighboring Valle d’Aosta and Valtellina, it is at its best in the Piedmontese villages of Barolo and Barbaresco. Nebbiolo is a finicky grape, and needs a very particular soil type in order to thrive. Outside of Italy, it often fails to show the captivating aromas for which it is so beloved, but some success has been achieved in parts of California.

In the Glass

Nebbiolo is an elegant variety with mouthwatering acidity and a compelling perfume of rose petals, violets, fresh tar, licorice, clay, and dried cherries. Light in color and body, Nebbiolo is a more powerful wine than one might expect, and its firm tannins typically need time to mellow. With age, it develops a velvety texture and a stunningly complex bouquet.

Perfect Pairings

Nebbiolo’s love affair with food starts in Piedmont, which is home to the Slow Food movement and some of Italy’s best produce. The region is famous for its white truffles and wild boar ragu, both of which make for excellent pairings with Nebbiolo.

Sommelier Secret

If you love Barolo and Barbaresco but can’t afford to drink them every night, you can try the more wallet-friendly, earlier-drinking Langhe Nebbiolo. But Piedmont’s best-kept secret is the northern part of the region, where outstanding earthy and rustic versions of the variety (known here as “Spanna”) are produced in Ghemme and Gattinara.

WBW30047140_2005 Item# 88622

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