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A. Christmann Riesling Pfalz 2010

Riesling from Pfalz, Germany
    11.2% ABV
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    11.2% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    The aroma has a nice sweetness, but it also contains a fabulous fresh, gorgeous tropical fruit that is highlighted with refreshing citrus nuances. The fine minerality complements the elegant bouquet. The palate is refined and refreshing breed. The wine is quite simply a world of good, that is pure uncomplicated drinking pleasure. And, most surprisingly, the wine left in the bottle tastes the next day even more intense and complex than shortly after opening.

    Critical Acclaim

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    A. Christmann

    A. Christmann

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    A. Christmann, Pfalz, Germany
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    In 1845 Prof. Dr. Ludwig Hausser and his cousin Johann Martin founded a small winery in Gimmeldingen as a hobby, and over the course of the next generation winemaking became their main profession. In 1894 Eduard Christmann married Henriette Hausser, the granddaughter of the founder. The Estate bears the name of her son Arnold, and is run in the 7th generation by Steffen Christmann.

    Devotion to soil vitality and the preservation and individuality of the terroir has lead them to practice organic agriculture, strict vineyard management, and severe yield reduction. In the cellar they employ long and gentle pressing with low pressure, clarification through natural sedimentation, and a slow, not too cool fermentation sometimes until as late as June with only one filtration. Today, A. Christmann Rieslings and Pinot Noirs are widely regarded as Pfalz's finest.

    This sunny and relatively dry region served for many years as a German tourist mecca and was associated with low cost, cheerful wines. But since the 1980s, it has gained a reputation as one of Germany’s more innovative regions, which has led to increased international demand.

    Riesling

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    A regal variety of incredible purity and precision, Riesling possesses a remarkable ability to reflect the character of wherever it is grown while still maintaining easily identifiable typicity. This versatile grape can be just as enjoyable dry or sweet, young or old, still or sparkling and can age longer than nearly any other white variety. Riesling is best known in Germany and Alsace, and is also of great importance in Austria. The variety has also been particularly successful in Australia’s Clare and Eden Valleys, New Zealand, Washington, cooler regions of California, and the Finger Lakes region of New York.

    In the Glass

    Riesling typically produces wine with relatively low alcohol, high acidity, steely minerality and stone fruit, spice, citrus and floral notes. At its ripest, it leans towards juicy peach, nectarine and pineapple, while cooler climes produce Rieslings more redolent of meyer lemon, lime and green apple. With age, Riesling can become truly revelatory, developing unique, complex aromatics, often with a hint of petrol.

    Perfect Pairings

    Riesling is quite versatile, enjoying the company of sweet-fleshed fish like sole, most Asian food, especially Thai and Vietnamese (bottlings with some residual sugar and low alcohol are the perfect companions for dishes with substantial spice) and freshly shucked oysters. Sweeter styles work well with fruit-based desserts.

    Sommelier Secret

    It can be difficult to discern the level of sweetness in a Riesling, and German labeling laws do not make things any easier. Look for the world “trocken” to indicate a dry wine, or “halbtrocken” or “feinherb” for off-dry. Some producers will include a helpful sweetness scale on the back label—happily, a growing trend.

    DSED6530_10_010_2010 Item# 121370