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Date Printed: 10/25/2014
Veuve Clicquot Rare Vintage in Cellar Box 1988
Veuve Clicquot Rare Vintage in Cellar Box 1988
(search item no. 89939)
collectible wine

Wine Enthusiast rating: 95 points
Wine & Spirits rating: 94 points
PRICE ON 10/25/2014: $99.00

Winemaker's Notes:

About the Cellar Box
True to its innovative spirit, Veuve Clicquot commissioned Pablo Reinoso, a creator acclaimed by architects for his city lights and interior designers for his contemporary furnishings, to develop the appropriate vessel to encase the Rare Vintages. The result is Reinoso's high-tech Cellar Box, a case that embodies modern design while preserving the Rare Vintage wines in the best possible conditions; reusable and stackable.

This Vintage is made up from twenty villages all classified as Premiers or Grands Crus. They are located in the Côte des Blancs and the Montagne de Reims regions. The dominance and power comes from the Pinot Noir, which represents 68% of the blend. The finesse and elegance are achieved from a complement of 32% Chardonnay.

Sensory notes
The effervescence is both delicate and long lasting. The bouquet is fine and complex, strong in the aromas of dried fruits and flowers. There is an elegant harmony in the nose around toast and brioche notes. In the mouth, the wine is firm and well structured, with masses of substance and refinement. Such wine accompanies perfectly lobsters, scallops and sea fish. After a few more years of ageing, one would not hesitate to offer it with poultry or with meat dishes such as veal.

My Notes:

Additional wines from Veuve Clicquot:

About Veuve Clicquot:

The House was founded by Philippe Clicquot in 1772. Since its inception, Veuve Clicquot has been a specialist in Champagnes based on Pinot Noir, especially Rosé. In 1803, François Clicquot was married to Barbe-Nicole Ponsardin. Madame Clicquot was widowed just two years later. Veuve Clicquot (Veuve means widow in French) took over her husband's business. In 1810, the house took the name Veuve Clicquot Ponsardin. The way that she ran her company, from risky overseas ventures to startling technological innovations, changed Champagne forever. Her motto is still the guiding principle of our company – "Only one quality – the finest."

In 1816, Mme. Clicquot invented the process, called rémuage or riddling, that removes the yeast from the bottle. She used holes cut in her kitchen table to perfect the method of slowly tilting and turning the bottles to gather the spent yeast in the neck of the bottle. Once settled it could be removed by freezing the neck in a brine of salt and water, removing it, and recorking.

The company was taken public in 1963, and merged with Louis Vuitton Moët Hennessey in 1986. Today, Jacques Peters is the chief winemaker at Veuve Clicquot, and was appointed cellar master in 1985. He has undertaken an ambitious program since this time to upgrade the grape sources, improve the vineyards, and improve the cellars and production facilities.