Sake    Junmai-Ginjo    Hiroshima    Japan   
Wine.com - Buy wines, wine clubs, gift baskets and more
My Rating (circle) :
Date Printed: 10/20/2014
Fukucho Moon on the Water Sake (300ML)
Fukucho Moon on the Water Sake (300ML)
(search item no. 92467)
International Wine Cellar rating: 88 points
PRICE ON 10/20/2014: $18.99

Winemaker's Notes:

A rather fragrant junmai ginjo, bottled immediately without charcoal filtering. The fine-lined flavor is as bold as the fragrance, with a soft-edged fullness overall.

Water in this region is very, very soft in comparison to most saké-brewing regions in Japan. This is a major contributor to the unique taste and feel of their saké. It melts and absorbs into the palate, taking flavor and fragrance with it in a very unique way.

"Rich, with robust linen aromas and almond, pepper and clove flavors. Intense as it drives to a powerful, milk chocolate-tinged finish."
Wine Spectator
April 30, 2007

My Notes:

About Fukucho:

Our brewery was founded in the first year of the Meiji Restoration, 1868, in Akitsu in Hiroshima Prefecture. Akitsu has the oldest sake-brewing history in Hiroshima, stretching back 400 years. Akitsu, which faces the Inland Sea and has a population of about 13,000 people, once had 17 sake breweries, but now there are only three. Hiroshima, however, is still one of the most significant sake-brewing regions in Japan, and is consistently among the top six prefectures nationwide in terms of annual sake production. Historically, the prefecture has always won many awards for its sake, and on occasion has even swept the top three awards in the country. The sake we brew here at Imada Shuzo, called Fukucho, is very representative of this great Hiroshima style.

The Sake
In general our sake is soft, clean and smooth, with a solid, lively fragrance. It is also a tad on the drier side. A full 60% of what we make is ginjo-shu; few places can say that. One major factor contributing to the taste and feel of our sake is the water. Water in this region in very, very soft in comparison to most sake-brewing regions in Japan. It melts and absorbs into the palate, taking flavor and fragrance with it, in a very unique way.