Red Wines    Nero d'Avola    Sicily    Italy   
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Date Printed: 11/24/2014
Feudo Maccari Nero d'Avola 2010
Feudo Maccari Nero d'Avola 2010
(search item no. 122991)
has fluid
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The Wine Advocate rating: 91 points
PRICE ON 11/24/2014: $14.99

Winemaker's Notes:

With a dark red ruby color, this wine shows expressive red berry aromas with herbal and fruity notes. On the palate, the flavors are structured and given balance by bright, cleansing acidity, a characteristic of Nero d'Avola grown in this area.
My Notes:

Additional wines from Feudo Maccari:

About Feudo Maccari:

The Feudo Maccari lies just over a mile from the sea, and basks in a dry, sun drenched climate verging on torrid in the summer months. Mediterranean winds moderate the climate and aerate the clusters, and some irrigation is required during the hot, dry season. The vineyards lie 240 feet above sea level on southerly exposed slopes, and the predominant volcanic soil profile is mixed in a few areas with white sand and chalk deposits. The Nero d’Avola vines are trained on trees in the traditional Sicilian manner, with the other varieties to more conventional systems. The first vintage of Saia, composed entirely of Nero d’Avola, is in the 2002 vintage; experimentation continues with other varieties.

The diversity of the estates’ soil and climatic conditions dictates that cultivation and winemaking follow the demands of the environment and pursuit of quality. Yields are restricted, and at harvest the clusters are handpicked, sorted, destemmed, and put into a conveyer-belt apparatus which breaks the skins rather than crushes the berries. Fermentation takes place in a combination of temperature controlled stainless steel and lined open-top fermentors with maceration periods appropriate to the varietal in question followed by natural malolactic fermentation in tank. Cooperage consists primarily of 225-liter barriques with some capacity in 500-litre tonneaux, and is of new and one year’s use; length of oak contact depends on both the wine and vintage, but generally lasts for a period of twelve to eighteen months. A first blending of lots takes place when the wine is placed in barrique; a second at the first racking. The wines are then bottled with minimum intervention.