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Date Printed: 7/25/2014
Bodegas Olivares Altos de la Hoya 2010
Bodegas Olivares Altos de la Hoya 2010
(search item no. 117301)
has fluid
has fluid 360

International Wine Cellar rating: 91 points
PRICE ON 7/25/2014: $11.99

ratings pedigree (past vintages):
2011 International Wine Cellar rating: 91 points
2009 The Wine Advocate rating: 90 points
2009 International Wine Cellar rating: 90 points
2008 International Wine Cellar rating: 91 points
2007 International Wine Cellar rating: 91 points
2006 International Wine Cellar rating: 91 points
2006 The Wine Advocate rating: 90 points
2005 International Wine Cellar rating: 91 points
2005 The Wine Advocate rating: 90 points
2003 The Wine Advocate rating: 90 points

Winemaker's Notes:

Deep ruby color. Ripe, powerful scents of red and dark fruits, minerals and spices. Finishes fresh and long, with a repeating dark fruit note. An exceptional combination with red meats and stews.

The heat-loving Monastrell is known as Mourvèdre in France's Rhone valley. Jumilla records show that Monastrell was used at least as early as the 15th century. Like the Rhone, Jumilla gets extremely hot during the summer days, but because of the 1,500 foot elevation, nights are very cool. This allows the grapes to become physiologically ripe, yet maintain their acidity.

My Notes:

Additional wines from Bodegas Olivares:

About Bodegas Olivares:

Jumilla was one of the few places in Europe spared during the Phylloxera epidemic of the late 1800's. Virtually everywhere else on the continent, vineyards were devastated and, to this day, can only be planted when grafted onto American rootstock.

For Jumilla, the key to its vineyards' survival was their sandy soil—which is anathema to the Phylloxera insect. As a glorious consequence, Jumilla not only has some of the oldest vines in the world, but also the largest number of ungrafted vines. Most of these vines are Mourvèdre, or Monastrell as it is locally known, one of the most prized varieties of Mediterranean Europe. And Jumilla's summers boast hot days and cool nights, perfect for ripening grapes, while maintaining acidity.

Today, Jumilla is awakening to its vast potential, and a winemaking revolution has followed — led by growers like Olivares' Paco Selva. He owns 65+ hectares of ungrafted old vineyards in the northern part of the appellation, called La Hoya de Santa Ana. It is the coolest sub-zone of Jumilla, with sandy, lime-rich soils that yield intensely aromatic wines, while protecting the ungrafted vines from Phylloxera.